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Implementing ENGAGE Strategies to Improve Retention: Focus on Spatial Skills: Engineering Schools Discuss Successes and Challenges

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engaging Students in Engineering (ENGAGE)

Tagged Division

Women in Engineering

Page Count

20

Page Numbers

22.819.1 - 22.819.20

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18100

Download Count

51

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Paper Authors

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Susan Staffin Metz Stevens Institute of Technology

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Susan Staffin Metz is Director of Special Projects in Engineering Education at Stevens Institute of Technology. As a founder and president (1997 – 2002) of WEPAN, Women in Engineering Proactive Network, Susan has worked with over 200 colleges and universities to increase access and engagement of women in engineering and science through research, policy and program development. She is currently the principal investigator for ENGAGE, Engaging Students in Engineering, (http://www.engageengineering.org/) a five-year project funded by the National Science Foundation to work with 30 engineering schools to integrate research based strategies that increase retention.

Susan has participated on numerous advisory boards for organizations including the National Science Foundation, National Academy of Engineering, and American Association for Advancement of Science. Her work has been recognized by the White House as a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring. Susan received the Maria Mitchell Association’s Women in Science Award and was named a Fellow by the Association for Women in Science.

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Sheryl A. Sorby Michigan Technological University

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Sheryl A. Sorby is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics and Director of Engineering Education and Research. She is the former Associate Dean for Academic Programs in the College of Engineering at Michigan Technological University and previously served as a rotator to the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation. Sorby is active in the American Society for Engineering Education serving as Director of Programs and past chair of the Engineering Design Graphics Division of ASEE. She was a recipient of the Dow Outstanding New Faculty award and the Distinguished Teaching award, both from the North Midwest Section of ASEE. Her research interests include spatial visualization and computer aided design. She was recently awarded WEPAN’s Betty Vetter Award for research on women in engineering.

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Tricia S. Berry University of Texas, Austin

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Tricia Berry, Director of the Women in Engineering Program (WEP) at The University of Texas at Austin, is responsible for leading the efforts on recruitment and retention of women in the Cockrell School of Engineering. She concurrently serves as Director of the Texas Girls Collaborative Project, connecting Texas organizations, companies and individuals working to advance gender equity in science, technology, engineering and math fields. Berry received her B.S. Chemical Engineering degree from the University of Texas, Austin in May 1993 and her M.B.A. from the University of Houston, Clear Lake in May 1999. She has been a member of the Women in Engineering ProActive Network (WEPAN) since 2001, most recently serving on the WEPAN Board as President Elect, President and Past President from 2007 - 2010.

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Carolyn Conner Seepersad University of Texas, Austin

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Ana Maria Dison University of Texas, Austin

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Ana Dison is a Senior Program Coordinator for Student Success in the Women in Engineering Program at The University of Texas at Austin. As an academic advisor in the Student Affairs Office for six years, Ana advised thousands of students, coordinated a wide variety of programs and served as the degree evaluator for the Cockrell School for four years.

Ana earned her bachelor's degree from The University of Texas at Austin in 1992 and a master's degree in College Student Services Administration from Oregon State University in 1994. After working for two years at the University of Maryland, Ana returned to the university in 1996 and was Assistant Director in the Division of Recreational Sports. She joined the Cockrell School in 2000.

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Yosef S. Allam The Ohio State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3677-7009

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Yosef S. Allam is an Auxiliary Faculty member in the First-Year Engineering Program within the Engineering Education Innovation Center at The Ohio State University. Some of his research interests in engineering education include spatial visualization, the use of learning management systems for large-sample educational research studies, curriculum development, and fulfilling the needs of an integrated, multi-disciplinary first-year engineering environment through the use of collaborative learning, problem-based learning (including design-build projects), classroom interaction, and multiple representations of concepts. He has his Ph.D. in Engineering Education from The Ohio State University and he earlier received an M.S. degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering with a specialization in Operations Research also from The Ohio State University.
Address: Engineering Education Innovation Center, College of Engineering, The Ohio State University, 244 Hitchcock Hall, 2070 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210-1278; email: allam.1@osu.edu.

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John A. Merrill Ohio State University

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Dr. John Merrill is Director of the First-Year Engineering Program at Ohio State University and a part of the management team for the Engineering Education Innovation Center. He is advisor to Engineers for Community Service, the Student Instructional Leadership Team, and a co-ed Engineering High School Explorer Post.

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Wally Peters University of South Carolina, Department of Mechanical Engineering

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Wally Peters has been a Professor at the University of South Carolina since 1980. He has received both the Mungo Teaching Award and the Amoco Teaching Award at USC. His research interests have included experimental mechanics, fracture mechanics, digital image correlation, biomechanics, sustainable design and development and complex systems.

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Erica Pfister-Altschul University of South Carolina

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Department of Mechanical Engineering

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Sarah C. Baxter University of South Carolina

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Sarah C. Baxter grew up in Colorado. She received an M.S. in Applied and Computational Mathematics from the University of Minnesota and a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Virginia. After postdoctoral work in applied mechanics, also at UVa, she was appointed to the faculty in Mechanical Engineering at the University of South Carolina, where she is currently an Associate Professor. Her research interests are in the nanomechanics and the mechanics of heterogeneous materials. She is the Liaison for the University of South Carolina ENGAGE Team.

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Guangming Zhang University of Maryland, College Park, Department of Mechanical Engineering

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B.S. and M.S., Tianjin University, China.
M.S. and Ph.D., UIUC, USA.

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James A. Leach University of Louisville

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Abstract

Implementing ENGAGE Strategies to Improve Retention: Engineering Schools Discuss Successes and ChallengesENGAGE - Engaging Students in Engineering, (www.EngageEngineering.org) is a five-yearExtension Services project funded by the National Science Foundation's GSE program.Extension Services projects are modeled after the Cooperative Extension Service in Land GrantInstitutions and are intended to extend proven, research-based strategies into STEM education.The overarching goal of ENGAGE is to increase the capacity of engineering schools to retainundergraduate students by facilitating the implementation of three strategies to improvestudents’ day-to-day classroom and educational experience.The first cohort of 10 engineering schools (20 more will be added) are working to implementENGAGE strategies in the 1st and 2nd year when student attrition is highest. The followingstrategies were selected because research indicates that they improve retention of undergraduateengineering students, particularly women; and because they are enhancements rather thanwholesale changes to the curriculum: Everyday Examples in Engineering (E3s): Involve faculty who teach 1st and 2nd year courses in efforts to use and develop examples that are familiar and engaging to students to illustrate theoretical concepts. Spatial Visualization Skills: Assess students’ spatial visualization skills and implement proven teaching and learning strategies to improve students’ spatial skills. Faculty- Student Interaction: Involve engineering faculty who teach 1st and 2nd year courses in efforts that build faculty knowledge and skill to better engage and interact with undergraduate engineering students inside and outside of the classroom.Although schools who are participating formally in ENGAGE are supported in their efforts in avariety of ways, ALL engineering schools have the ability and capacity to integrate ENGAGEmethods into the undergraduate experience. The objective of this session is to: highlightbriefly, the research that serves as the foundation of each strategy; identify ENGAGE resourcesthat are available to all schools; and learn from the experiences of ENGAGE schools who areemploying the three strategies with their undergraduates. Preliminary evaluation andassessment data of both the ENGAGE project overall and individual schools will be presented.To accomplish this objective, moderated by the PI, individuals from three of the currentENGAGE schools who have compelling experiences and data to share will discuss how they areimplementing the strategies, and will address their successes and challenges. Current ENGAGEschools include: Kettering University, Purdue University, Rose-Hulman Institute ofTechnology, Stevens Institute of Technology, The Ohio State University, The University ofTexas at Austin, University of Louisville, University of Maryland, University of South Carolinaand Virginia Tech.

Metz, S. S., & Sorby, S. A., & Berry, T. S., & Seepersad, C. C., & Dison, A. M., & Allam, Y. S., & Merrill, J. A., & Peters, W., & Pfister-Altschul, E., & Baxter, S. C., & Zhang, G., & Leach, J. A. (2011, June), Implementing ENGAGE Strategies to Improve Retention: Focus on Spatial Skills: Engineering Schools Discuss Successes and Challenges Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/18100

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