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Improving Economic Benefits In The Management Of Multi Family Housing Using Solar Energy Conservation Strategies

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Trends in Energy Conversion/Conservation

Page Count

6

Page Numbers

8.670.1 - 8.670.6

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12042

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

author page

Keith Sylvester

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

2177

Improving Economic Benefits in the Management of Multifamily Housing Using Solar Energy Conservation Strategies

Keith E. Sylvester, Ph.D., Associate AIA

3137 TAMU, Texas A&M University Department of Construction Science Energy Systems Laboratory College Station, Texas 77843-3137,USA Ph: (979) 458-2692, Fax: (979) 862-1572 ksylvester@tamu.edu

Abstract

With a shift from large, central power plants to smaller generating facilities, small renewable energy systems (SRES) are viable due to the coincidence of several events: 1) deregulation of the electric utility 2) development of BIPV roofing systems, and 3) federal and state tax credits. Roof mounted modules have been tested and used intensively, as seen in the solar roof programs around the world. However, despite the currently available technology, efforts to integrate PV systems into roof system have been minimal. Previous research shows that multifamily housing complexes are ideal candidates as small power producers (SPP) due to their 1) flexible roof configurations, 2) high percentage of roof area and 3) rent base management structure. Projected to provide up to 70% of a building’s electric demand, integrated PV fenestration can offset the overall utility costs and produce energy that can be sold to the building’s tenants. This paper presents findings from student centered research of a prototypical study of multi-family housing utility subsidiary that sells renewable electric energy produced by integrated photovoltaic roof systems to the tenants. The results show significant economic benefits while increasing the building’s energy conservation.

Introduction

Projected to provide up to 70% of a building’s electric demand when designed for their optimal energy production, research and application of building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems integrate electricity producing building products to replace traditional building materials (Ashley 1992). Converting sunlight into electricity, these systems offset the energy use of the building while serving as weathering skin, sun shading, and roof and window systems. Because they provide a viable alternative and renewable method for generating electric energy, BIPV systems improve and secure our economic growth by reducing our dependence on non- renewable energy that we ourselves do not control.

Government Policy and Support

With a shift from large, central power plants to smaller generating facilities, small renewable energy systems (SRES) are viable due to the coincidence of several events: 1) deregulation of the electric utility 2) development of BIPV roofing systems, and 3) federal and state tax credits. The

Proceedings of the 2003 American Society of Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2003, American Society for Engineering

Sylvester, K. (2003, June), Improving Economic Benefits In The Management Of Multi Family Housing Using Solar Energy Conservation Strategies Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12042

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