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Impulse Calculation of Model Rocket Engines

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Engineering Physics and Physics Division Technical Session 1

Tagged Division

Engineering Physics and Physics

Page Count

20

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32953

Download Count

27

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Paper Authors

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Hüseyin Sarper P.E. Old Dominion University

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Hüseyin Sarper, Ph.D., P.E. is a Master Lecturer with a joint appointment the Engineering Fundamentals Division and the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. He was a professor of engineering and director of the graduate programs at Colorado State University – Pueblo in Pueblo, Col. until 2013. He was also an associate director of Colorado's NASA Space Grant Consortium between 2007 and 2013. His degrees, all in industrial engineering, are from the Pennsylvania State University (BS) and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (MS and Ph.D.). His interests include Space, manufacturing, reliability, economic analysis, and renewable energy.

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Drew Landman Old Dominion University

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Dr. Landman is a Professor of Aerospace Engineering at Old Dominion University where he teaches graduate level classes in aerodynamics and statistical based experiment design, and supervises doctoral and masters students. His current research areas include use of Design of Experiments(DOE) in wind tunnel force measurement system design, and development of in-flight test methods for use with unmanned aerial vehicles. Landman was jointly appointed as Chief Engineer at the Langley Full-Scale Tunnel (LFST) at NASA Langley until its closing in September 2009. During his 13 year tenure at the LFST, Dr. Landman was responsible for designing force measurement systems and supervising wind tunnel tests on a variety of test articles including aerospace and ground vehicles. Dr. Landman has served as an international consultant for training engineers in DOE as applied to aerospace ground testing.

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Nebojsa I. Jaksic Colorado State University, Pueblo Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0003-1695-790X

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NEBOJSA I. JAKSIC earned the Dipl. Ing. degree in electrical engineering from Belgrade University (1984), the M.S. in electrical engineering (1988), the M.S. in industrial engineering (1992), and the Ph.D. in industrial engineering from the Ohio State University (2000). He is currently a Professor at Colorado State University-Pueblo teaching robotics and automation courses. Dr. Jaksic has over 80 publications and holds two patents. Dr. Jaksic's interests include robotics, automation, and nanotechnology engineering education and research. He is a licensed PE in the State of Colorado, a member of ASEE, a senior member of IEEE, and a senior member of SME.

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Ben J. Stuart P.E. Old Dominion University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5759-0174

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Ben Stuart currently holds the position of Senior Associate Dean and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Old Dominion University. His current research interests include biofuels production from waste and renewable feedstocks (specifically algal biomass), CO2 capture using a novel membrane photobioreactor, and thermochemical processing of biomass. Dr. Stuart received his Ph.D. from the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey and he is a registered professional environmental engineer in the State of Ohio.

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Joseph Tyler Zongolowicz NAVAIR

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I attended Old Dominion University for Mechanical Engineering where I focused my studies on Thermal Sciences. Towards to end of my undergraduate career I began taking graduate classes to earn my master's degree one year after my bachelor's degree. Upon completion of my degrees I moved to Maryland to work for the NAVAIR as a civilian. My current areas of interest include air breathing propulsion technologies, rocket propulsion, test methods, and heat/energy transfer.

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Linda Vahala Old Dominion University

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Dr. Linda Vahala received her B.S..degree from the University of Illinois in 1969, an M.S. degree from the University of Iowa in 1971, and a Ph.D from Old Dominion University in 1983. Her publications include articles in both plasma physics and atomic physics with an emphasis on laser interactions with plasma and with neutral/rare gas collisions. She has presented her work at various international workshops and meetings, both in Europe and in the United States. She is currently Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at ODU. In 1995, she received the Peninsula Engineer of the Year award.

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Abstract

IMPULSE CALCULATION OF MODEL ROCKET ENGINES FROM EXPERIMENTAL DATA In order to provide the engineering freshmen with a hands-on experience to teach them important physical and calculus concepts, a model rocket thrust test stand was designed and integrated with a data acquisition system. The purpose of the experiment is to show how impulse is calculated experimentally. The thrust test stand features a precise load cell and a flexure load frame that ensures that only the thrust from the engine is measured. The design of the stand is horizontal to avoid errors caused by the change in engine mass during combustion. The test stand was designed and built by a graduate student so that students in the introduction to engineering course can conduct their own experiments using model rocket engines of various sizes. The data from the load cell is collected and analyzed using a stand-alone data acquisition unit and LabVIEW software. The user obtains burn-time (x) and thrust (y) data. Integrating the resulting curve y(x) yields the impulse (N-sec) using an embedded MATLAB program invoked by the GUI used to run the entire experiment. Students have enjoyed conducting experiments using the new apparatus. They have observed different impulse values for successive tests using ostensibly identical engines. This, in turn, partially accounted for different maximum altitudes reached by the same model rocket. The primary educational benefit of the experiment comes from using the downloaded test data and processing the data manually as a team project. Students learned how to directly calculate the impulse by writing code both in Excel and Matlab to calculate the area under the thrust versus burn-time curve. Hence, students were able to understand and apply the concept of integration as they were analyzing data obtained from a real event. The concept of “area under the curve” and its importance in engineering became clear to all of them early on, even before many of them have taken calculus. For the above set of activities, a students’ attitude assessment survey was designed, implemented, and analyzed. Overall, students felt this was a very exciting and a worthwhile learning experience that taught them the concept of integration and variability in experimentally acquired quantities. Students also claimed that this learning experience enhanced their Excel skills while introducing them briefly to Matlab software and its capabilities.

Sarper, H., & Landman, D., & Jaksic, N. I., & Stuart, B. J., & Zongolowicz, J. T., & Vahala, L. (2019, June), Impulse Calculation of Model Rocket Engines Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32953

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