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Inclusive Leadership Development for Engineering Undergraduate Students

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Innovative and Impactful Engineering Leadership Pedagogy

Tagged Division

Engineering Leadership Development

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

21

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37315

Download Count

142

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Paper Authors

biography

Meg Handley Pennsylvania State University

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Meg Handley is currently the Associate Director for Engineering Leadership Undergraduate Programs at Penn State University. Meg completed her PhD in Workforce Education at Penn State, where she focused on interpersonal behaviors and their impact on engineering leadership potential. Meg is a board certified coach with experience in developing students' leadership and professional competencies through teaching and one-on-one coaching. She is most interested in developing student knowledge of leadership to impact their successful transition to the workplace.

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biography

Mihee Park Pennsylvania State University

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MIHEE PARK, MS, is pursuing her PhD in Workforce Education and Development, College of Education,Pennsylvania State University. Her major research interests lie in the areas of diversity and inclusion, inclusive leadership, engineering ethics, sustainability education and practice, and multiculturalism. Email: mimipark2023@gmail.com

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Ashley N. Patterson Pennsylvania State University

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Dr. Patterson joined Penn State's Curriculum and Instruction team in Fall 2015. Trained in Special and Elementary Education at Boston University and Reading Specialization at Hood College, she completed her PhD work at The Ohio State University in Multicultural and Equity Studies in Education where she also earned an MA in Quantitative Research, Evaluation and Measurement. Dr. Patterson's work in the educational field began as an elementary level inclusive special educator. She is committed to preparing educators who take up a critical lens to working with children and best serving their needs while seeking ways to deconstruct inequities woven into the US's existing public school system and structure. To this end, Dr. Patterson serves as a co-coordinator for the newly (2020) established Social Justice in Education minor available to students across the University. Broadly, Dr. Patterson's research interests consider intersections between identity and education, considering the dialogic relationship that exists as the ways we think about ourselves impact our educational experiences while our educational experiences impact the ways we think about ourselves. Employing an intersectional approach to considering identity, Dr. Patterson's research examines race conjointly with a host of other contextually important and influential identity markers.

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biography

John Jongho Park Pennsylvania State University

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Dr. Park is an assistant research professor in the Engineering Leadership Program at Penn State University. There is four interrelated areas of inquiry characterize Dr. Park’s scholarship: engineering leadership, professional identity development, sustainability education, and psychological well-being. Particularly, he examines how possible future-self influences engineering students’ learning, academic motivation, and career trajectory. The major population he primarily focuses on is STEM undergraduate and graduate students. He has received extensive qualitative and quantitative methodological training in the area of educational psychology. He acquired a Bachelor’s of Science in Human Resources Management and a Masters of Educational Technology from California State University, Long Beach, and a Master’s of Program Evaluation and a Doctorate of Philosophy from the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to joining the Penn State University, he worked as a research fellow and program evaluator at University of Michigan. Also he taught an “individual learning skills” as an assistant instructor in the University of Texas at Austin for five years.

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Abstract

Confronting bias within white male dominated engineering classrooms often deters faculty from implementing curriculum to address racial disparities and diversity and inclusion issues within in education. This potential high social cost, and the lack of training on examining bias and racial disparities for engineering educators, are significant hurdles in the development and implementation of curriculum addressing systemic racism and bias. Considering these challenges relative to systemic racism and engineering instruction, inclusive leadership provides a framework to foster discussion and knowledge of bias in engineering classrooms. Inclusive leadership behaviors within teams have positive relationships with innovation, creativity, project success, work engagement, productivity, and collaboration. These relationships are important to acknowledge in engineering leadership development due to their importance in supporting project work, innovation, and creativity within engineering teams. This study describes an inclusive leadership module in an engineering leadership course and evaluates students’ pre/post outcomes of perceived knowledge regarding inclusive leadership and unconscious bias. The course employs didactic and experimental learning strategies to build knowledge of self and others. Assignments associated with the module require students to use perspective taking strategies and consciousness raising strategies to foster knowledge of implicit and explicit bias. Pre- and post self-ratings of knowledge gained on inclusive leadership and unconscious bias will be assessed for approximately 80 undergraduate engineering students in an engineering leadership development course during a fall semester. Results of this study will be used to assess effectiveness of pedagogical approaches and will include a discussion of faculty experiences in implementing these concepts into curriculum. This study aims to contribute to the expanding and imperative body of knowledge calling for engineering educators to acknowledge and address the issues of systemic racism in engineering work and education. This paper aligns with the Lead Division, Assess (#4) strategic initiative and is a research submission.

Handley, M., & Park, M., & Patterson, A. N., & Park, J. J. (2021, July), Inclusive Leadership Development for Engineering Undergraduate Students Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37315

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