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Incorporating Electric Drives Into The Electrical Machines Course: A Systems Level Approach

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

6.572.1 - 6.572.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9370

Download Count

261

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Paper Authors

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Michael Ropp

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Steven Hietpas

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1526

Incorporating Electric Drives into the Electrical Machines Course: A Systems Level Approach

Steven M. Hietpas and Michael E. Ropp

Department of Electrical Engineering, South Dakota State University, SD 57007

Abstract

Over the last 35 years, the advent of power electronics has extensively impacted almost every aspect of Electromechanical Energy Conversion (EMEC). The effective integration of power electronics, electric drives, and system issues into the EMEC curriculum demands a significant redesign of both the course and laboratory exercises. One such redesign, currently being supported under the Adaptation and Implementation track of the NSF’s CCLI program, is the subject of this paper. An existing undergraduate “electric machines” course has been converted into an “EMEC systems” course in which power generation, power processing, and end-use equipment are integrated. A "just-in-time" strategy has been adapted and implemented into the EMEC course. Of particular interest is the need to provide students with end-to-end instruction on the analysis and design steps followed in the development of an electric drive system.

I. Introduction

Power electronic devices have enabled unprecedented control over and flexibility of EMEC, and because of their advantages such devices have become extremely common in practice and continue to become more prevalent1. Today, electric machines are frequently only one component in an EMEC system (frequently referred to as a “drive”). Clearly, the “traditional” education in EMEC, which considers electric machines in isolation and barely mentions power electronics, no longer adequately prepares undergraduate students for a career in power engineering.

The effective integration of power electronics, electric drives, and system issues into the EMEC curriculum demands a significant redesign of both the course and laboratory exercises. Such a redesign has been undertaken at South Dakota State University (SDSU) and supported by a grant from NSF under the A&I track of CCLI2, which began in January of 2000 and is scheduled for completion in December of 2001. This paper discusses the EMEC course redesign, including the approach adopted, logistical challenges, and results to date.

Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Ropp, M., & Hietpas, S. (2001, June), Incorporating Electric Drives Into The Electrical Machines Course: A Systems Level Approach Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9370

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