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Incorporating Robotic Simulation Technology Into The Undergraduate Curriculum Of Robotics And Industrial Automation

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

4.306.1 - 4.306.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7728

Download Count

134

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Paper Authors

author page

Frank Cheng

author page

Daniel M. Chen

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1463 TS/ 3

Incorporating Robotic Simulation Technology into the Undergraduate Curriculum of Robotics and Industrial Automation

Frank Cheng, Daniel Chen

Department of Industrial and Engineering Technology Central Michigan University fcheng@iet.cmich.edu

Abstract

Simulation technology has not only fundamentally changed the way of conducting integrated product design and process development in industries, but also provided educators with new approaches to enhance the learning environment for the best engineering education in schools. This paper describes the authors’ initial experience of incorporating robotic workcell simulation technology into the undergraduate coursework of robotics and automation. This includes the discussions about the significant impacts of robotic simulation technology on the processes of learning and conducting robotic workcell design in both industries and schools. The practice has shown that robotic simulation software is an excellent tool for people to study and develop methods of fast product design, manufacturing process planning, and plant floor/cell control support.

I. Introduction

Rapid deployment has been proven by many companies to be successful solutions for meeting the immense demand of product changes. This procedure integrates concepts, tools, and methods of fast product design, manufacturing process planning, and plant floor/cell control support 1. Among the important technologies for implementing this solution is simulation 2. Companies such as General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler have used simulation technology to lower the costs and shorten the product development life cycle. Their practice demonstrates that current simulation packages are capable of providing an interactive and accurate virtual environment with which designers can model and evaluate designed products and processes for low cost and reliable solutions, and without delaying production time and risking equipment damage 2,3,4,5.

Currently, in automotive industries the high demand for implementing rapid deployment technology through simulation has already created a growing shortage of qualified employees who can carry out virtual engineering design. At the same time, the educators from Michigan’s high schools, colleges and universities have also recognized the changes, challenges, and demands faced by today’s automotive industries. They believe that learning rapid deployment technology is important to Michigan’s students as they are preparing for their careers in high- tech industry 6.

Cheng, F., & Chen, D. M. (1999, June), Incorporating Robotic Simulation Technology Into The Undergraduate Curriculum Of Robotics And Industrial Automation Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/7728

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