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Industrially Supported Projects In A Capstone Design Sequence

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Trends in Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

8.698.1 - 8.698.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12154

Download Count

105

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Paper Authors

author page

Amir Karimi

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1566

Industrially Supported Projects in a Capstone Design Sequence

Amir Karimi, Jahan Eftekhar, Randall Manteufel, and Yesh Singh Department of Mechanical Engineering The University of Texas at San Antonio

Abstract

The design experience in the mechanical engineering BS degree program at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) contains a senior-level capstone design course sequence, providing students an opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge gained throughout the curriculum to the development of an instructor-approved project. The two-semester course sequence provides sufficient time for students to complete a project involving the design of a relatively complex system. In the last few years, representatives from industry have been invited to sponsor design projects. Several manufacturing companies and consulting firms have responded positively and actively participated in funding and mentoring capstone design projects. Engineers employed by these companies have served as project mentors and participated in evaluating the final reports and oral presentations. Industrial participation in our capstone design sequence has provided our students with a unique design experience opportunity. This paper describes the content of the capstone design sequence, provides short descriptions of industrial projects companies, and includes examples of completed design projects.

I. Introduction

The mechanical engineering undergraduate curriculum at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) was recently revised1. Design experience is integrated throughout the revised curriculum. Development of open-ended problem solving skills is a part of all mechanical engineering courses. Design projects with formal report writing are included in many of the required courses, including ME 1403–Engineering Graphics and Design, ME 3513–Mechanism Design, ME 4293–Thermodynamic II, ME 4313–Heat Transfer and Rate Processes, and ME 4603–FEA in Mechanical Design. A substantial portion of each technical elective course is devoted to design of systems and components. The design components of these courses assist the development of student creativity, use of open-ended problems, development and use of modern design theory and methodology, formulation of design problem statements and specifications, consideration of alternative solutions, and feasibility considerations. A capstone design sequence at the senior level provides an opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge gained throughout the curriculum to the development of an instructor-approved project.

Starting in Fall of 1998, ME 4811-ME Design Project Planning was added to the list of required courses, creating a capstone design sequence, thereby providing additional time to be devoted to the senior design project. This course is now a prerequisite for ME 4813-ME Design Project. In

Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Karimi, A. (2003, June), Industrially Supported Projects In A Capstone Design Sequence Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12154

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