Asee peer logo

Innovative And Transformative Learning Environments In Construction Engineering And Management Education

Download Paper |

Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Construction Classroom Development

Tagged Division

Construction

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

15.740.1 - 15.740.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16410

Download Count

116

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Namhun Lee East Carolina University

author page

Eddy Rojas University of Washington

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Innovative and Transformative Learning Environments in Construction Engineering and Management Education

Abstract

Most of today’s students have grown up with technology including computers, the Internet, video games, digital recorders or players, and mobile phones. Consequently, it can be argued these students are fundamentally different from previous generations in how they learn. Today’s students prefer instantly seeing, simultaneously interacting, and constantly communicating with learning environments. They learn actively, rather than passively, by taking advantage of technology.

Traditional construction engineering and management (CEM) education follows the Cartesian view of mind-matter dualism where the learner and the learning context are detached. Under this paradigm, concepts are presented as fixed, well- structured, and independent entities. Learning activities are divorced from their authentic context resulting in fragmentation and specialization of courses and educational experiences. This fragility can be observed in school when students neither retain nor are able to utilize knowledge allegedly acquired in previous courses. These problems are not exclusive to CEM education, but shared by most higher education models.

Traditional CEM education models, based on precisely well-defined problems and formal definitions, may not be satisfactorily fulfilling their mission of educating the leaders of tomorrow. Indeed, most students who use digital technology in daily life still come to class, sit in front of the lecturer, and memorize concepts without the proper context. Several efforts have been undertaken to develop learning environments to cope with the limitations in traditional learning paradigms which set up a dichotomy between the learner and the learning context. A variety of advanced educational tools such as games and simulations using innovative technology are examples of these efforts. This paper discusses the need and use of games and simulations as educational tools in construction engineering and management while proposing alternatives to the traditional educational paradigm so that students experience concepts embedded in their proper context promoting learning within the nexus of the activity.

Introduction

Over the last few decades, technology has been rapidly developed and disseminated. Most of today’s students have grown up with technology including computers, the Internet, video games, digital recorders or players, and mobile phones. The current generation of students is often called digital natives since they use technology for social networking, blogging, communication, information,

Lee, N., & Rojas, E. (2010, June), Innovative And Transformative Learning Environments In Construction Engineering And Management Education Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16410

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2010 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015