Asee peer logo

Innovative Graduate Engineering Education Implemented with Project-focused Learning: A Case Study—The Clemson University Deep Orange 3 Vehicle Prototype Program

Download Paper |

Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

College Industry Partnerships Division Technical Session 2

Tagged Division

College Industry Partnerships

Page Count

19

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30668

Download Count

39

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

David Schmueser Clemson University

visit author page

David Schmueser joined the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR) in August 2013 as Adjunct Professor of Automotive Engineering. He received his BS and MS degrees in Engineering Mechanics, and a PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering, all from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Prior to joining the CU-ICAR staff, Dr. Schmueser worked as a research engineer at Battelle Memorial Institute in Columbus, Ohio and as a senior staff engineer at General Motors Research Labs in Warren, Michigan. More recently, he was an Adjunct Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan and University Business Development Manager-US for Altair Inc. in Troy, Michigan. Dr. Schmueser has over 30 years experience in light-weight materials design, vehicle optimal structural design, and computer-aided-engineering instruction. He currently serves as Past Chair of the College-Industry Partnership Division of the American Society of Engineering Education.

visit author page

biography

Johnell O. Brooks Clemson University

visit author page

Johnell Brooks is a Human Factors Psychologist. She was heavily involved with Deep Orange for projects Deep Orange 2 through 7.

visit author page

biography

Robert Gary Prucka Clemson University

visit author page

Dr. Robert Prucka is an Associate Professor in the Department of Automotive Engineering at the Clemson University – International Center for Automotive Research. His research and teaching interests include the design, performance, control, calibration, and emissions of advanced internal combustion engines. He has extensive engine testing experience, including dynamometer cell design and advanced instrumentation development. Currently, his research group is developing novel experimental techniques, simulations and control strategies for advanced high degree of freedom spark-ignition engines to improve fuel economy and reduce time to market. Dr. Prucka is also the team leader for one of the current Deep Orange prototype vehicle programs at Clemson University, the faculty advisor for the Clemson University – Racing student team, and is active in the motorsports engineering initiatives of the Brooks Sports Science Institute. He has three degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan; PhD (2008), MSE (2004) and BSE. (2000). Prior to joining Clemson Robert has worked for the Ford Motor Company and as an independent consultant for racing engine companies.

visit author page

biography

Pierluigi Pisu Clemson University

visit author page

Dr. Pierluigi Pisu is an Associate Professor with the Department of Automotive Engineering and the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research. Dr. Pisu joined Clemson University in July 2006. He is the faculty elected Leader of the Connected Vehicle Technology Faculty Research Group in the College of Engineering and Science and the Leader of the Deep Orange 8 and 10 Projects. Dr. Pisu also holds a joint appointment with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Clemson University. His research interests lie in the area of functional safety, security, control and optimization of Cyber-Physical Systems with emphasis in both theoretical formulation and virtual/hardware-in-the-loop validation. He published 34 journal papers and 80 conference papers; he holds 3 patents and published a book on “Fault Detection and Isolation with Applications to Vehicle Systems”.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

The Deep Orange initiative is an integral component of the graduate program in the Department of Automotive Engineering at Clemson University. The ultimate goal of Deep Orange is to place automotive engineering knowledge into context to tackle complex vehicle development problems through collaboration among students and colleagues whose perspectives are shaped by radically different experiences. During the 2-year MS program, students, faculty, and participating industry partners develop and manufacture a vehicle prototype providing the students with experience in marketing, design, engineering, systems integration, prototyping, and validation. For the third edition of Deep Orange, the goal was to develop a blank sheet, fully functional, hybrid mainstream sports car concept targeted towards Generation Y with Mazda North American Operations as the primary sponsor and the Art Center College of Design as the styling partner.

The objective of this paper is to present a case study for the development of the unique Deep Orange 3 body-in-white (BIW) prototype vehicle structure. The size and proportions of the BIW concept were developed based on the requirements derived from a marketing study based on 70,000 surveys completed by owners of new cars and light trucks in the United States. Based on the findings of the marketing study, a sports car concept was derived for a 6-seat interior configuration and a body architecture packaging a dual-mode hybrid all-wheel drive powertrain. In addition to developing an efficient body structural lay-out, an additional objective of the program was to develop and showcase a BIW concept that would eliminate metal stamping and the associated high investment costs associated with this technology (such as stamping tools and dies). It was chosen to investigate and apply Industrial Origami’s patented technology that incorporates light-gauge metal folded into complex, high load-bearing structure, formed with simple, low-cost fixtures at the location of BIW assembly.

Developing the geometry, topology, and functionality of the BIW based on these design and manufacturing requirements required intensive collaboration among design students and chassis, vibration, powertrain, and packaging engineering students, while at the same time integrating functional properties, weight, cost, and design space. The BIW engineering discussed in this paper focused on defining relevant load cases (such as static/dynamic stiffness properties), developing a structural configuration to efficiently transfer BIW loads, creating occupant accommodation space, packaging of powertrain and chassis components, and conducting computational analyses to assess BIW stiffness and strength. Once the structural performance targets were met, the final sheet metal folded design was realized using aluminum in combination with adhesives and rivets. In addition to describing the conceptual structural analysis, the paper elaborates on the team collaboration required to achieve the final realization of the BIW structure.

Schmueser, D., & Brooks, J. O., & Prucka, R. G., & Pisu, P. (2018, June), Innovative Graduate Engineering Education Implemented with Project-focused Learning: A Case Study—The Clemson University Deep Orange 3 Vehicle Prototype Program Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30668

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2018 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015