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Instructional Laboratory For Visualization And Manipulation Of Nanoscale Components Using Low Cost Atomic Force Microscopes

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

15.752.1 - 15.752.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16720

Download Count

28

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Paper Authors

biography

Salahuddin Qazi SUNY Institute of Technology

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Salahuddin Qazi is a full Professor at the School of Information Systems and Engineering

Technology, State University of New York Institute of Technology (SUNYIT), Utica, NY. He teaches and conducts research in the areas of Fiber Optics, Optical and Wireless Communication, and Nanotechnology. Dr. Qazi is recipient of several awards including the William Goodell award for research creativity at SUNYIT and engineering professionalism by Mohawk Valley Engineering Executive Committee, and forging closer relations with the IEEE Mohawk Valley section. He is a Senior Member of IEEE and a member of ASEE.

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biography

Robert C Decker Mohawk Valley Community College

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Mr. Robert C. Decker is a Professor in the Center for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics at Mohawk Valley Community College in Utica, NY where he instructs courses in the Electrical Engineering Technology program. His collaborative efforts include curriculum and materials development in highly automated technology and nanotechnology education. He is a member of IEEE.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Instructional Laboratory For Visualization and Manipulation of Nanoscale Components Using Low Cost Atomic Force Microscopes

Abstract

Visualization and manipulation of nanoscale components in the field of nanotechnology has many applications including bottom-up nanomanufacturing and the manipulation of DNA and viruses, prototyping of single electron transistors, and characterization and monitoring of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and semiconductors.

Scanning probe microscopy tools including the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) provide the tools for visualization and manipulation of these nanoscale materials. Scanning probe microscopes have been expensive and were used mainly by research universities and high tech industries. However, due to the increasing need for STM/AFM tools for teaching purposes, leading manufacturers of STM/AFM instruments have developed lower cost, high-value scanning probe microscopes with more user-friendly interfaces for student use. Developing new learning facilities and forging collaboration between different academic institutions and industry will lead to new curricula which will help train a knowledgeable workforce with suitable background to meet the demand of nanotechnology based industries.

The purpose of our paper is to discuss the results of establishing an instructional lab for the visualization and manipulation of nanoscale components using low cost AFMs for two and four year engineering technology programs. Development of an interdisciplinary minor in nanotechnology will also be discussed. This effort is supported through the National Science Foundation under the Course Curriculum Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program.

Introduction and Background

Recent growth in the field of nanotechnology has put a new demand on educators to train a knowledgeable workforce in this field with suitable background to meet the demand of nanotechnology based industries. According to Jack Uldrich 1 of Nano Veritas, the U.S. will need between 1 and 2 million new workers trained in nanoscience, with a majority requiring skills that must be taught at undergraduate level. Developing new learning facilities and forging collaboration between different academic institutions and industry will lead to new curricula which will help to meet the demand for technical personnel.

SUNYIT (State University of New York Institute of Technology) located at Marcy, New York and MVCC (Mohawk Valley Community College) located at Utica, New York, are currently teaching and developing courses in the area of nanotechnology, MEMS and semiconductor manufacturing technology in their practice oriented engineering technology programs. Both institutions are also involved in introducing elements of nanotechnology in other courses and programs. In order to provide hands–on instruction for these programs, it is important to include experimental study of ultra-small scale phenomena from the micro scale down to the atomic scale by way of visualization and manipulation of nanoscale

Qazi, S., & Decker, R. C. (2010, June), Instructional Laboratory For Visualization And Manipulation Of Nanoscale Components Using Low Cost Atomic Force Microscopes Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16720

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2010 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015