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Integrating Design For Supply Chain Research Into A Graduate Supply Chain Modeling Course – A Collaborative Approach

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Focus on IE Principles and Techniques

Tagged Division

Industrial Engineering

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

13.761.1 - 13.761.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4131

Download Count

63

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Paper Authors

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Ricki Ingalls Oklahoma State University

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Ricki G. Ingalls, Ph.D. is Associate Professor and Site Director of the Center for Engineering Logistics and Distribution (CELDi) in the School of Industrial Engineering and Management at Oklahoma State University. He has developed a graduate program in Supply Chain Engineering where he teaches Supply Chain Strategy and Supply Chain Modeling. Dr. Ingalls joined Oklahoma State in 2000 after 16 years in industry with Compaq, SEMATECH, General Electric and Motorola. He has a B.S. in Mathematics from East Texas Baptist College (1982), a M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Texas A&M University (1984) and a Ph.D. in Management Science from the University of Texas at Austin (1999).

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mario cornejo Oklahoma State University

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Mario Cornejo is a Ph.D student in Industrial Engineering and Management at Oklahoma State University. Mario got his M.S. in Industrial Engineering at Oklahoma State University in 2005; then he worked at DELL implementing Six Sigma methodology where he got certified as a DELL-Green Belt and an ASQ-Black Belt. Before joining the master program, Mario worked for four years at an aircraft repair station of an airline company in inventory control and production planning areas. He also holds a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from Universidad Centroamericana, in San Salvador.

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Chinnatat Methapatara Oklahoma State University

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Chinnatat Methapatara is Master's Candidate in the School of Industrial Engineering and Management at Oklahoma State University, OSU. He is currently working as a Research Assistant on the Design for Supply Chain project. Prior to joining OSU he worked as a Research Assistant and a Systems Engineer. In 2005 he received his Bachelor's Degree from King Mongkut's Institute of Technology North Bangkok in the field of Electrical Engineering.

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Peerapol Sittivijan Oklahoma State University

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Peerapol Sittivijan received his Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and Master’s degree in Transportation Engineering in Mahidol University and Asian Institute of Technology respectively. He has also worked as a transportation planner and analyst where he performed transportation modeling and traffic analysis. Peerapol is a Master's student in Industrial Engineering at Oklahoma State University working on a project entitled Freight Movement Model Development for Oklahoma and Product Design for Supply Chain, where he develops a model to forecast freight flow patterns in the U.S., especially focusing on the area in the state of Oklahoma.

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Kim Needy University of Pittsburgh

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Kim LaScola Needy is an Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Industrial Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, and her Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from Wichita State University. Prior to her academic appointment, she accumulated nine years of industrial experience while working at PPG Industries and The Boeing Company. Her research interests include engineering economic analysis, engineering management, integrated resource management, and sustainable engineering. Dr. Needy is a member of ASEE, ASEM, APICS, IIE, and SWE. She is a licensed P.E. in Kansas.

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Bryan Norman University of Pittsburgh

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Bryan A. Norman is an Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. He received his MS and BS in Industrial Engineering at the University of Oklahoma and his Ph.D. in Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan. Dr. Norman's primary research interests include logistics and the application of operations research models to production and logistics. His particular areas of emphasis include scheduling, facility layout and design, and the application of RFID for inventory and asset management. He is a member of ASEE, IIE, and INFORMS.

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Braden Hunsaker University of Pittsburgh

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Brady Hunsaker is a software engineer at Google. He received his B.A. in Mathematics from Harvard University, his M.S. in Operations Research and his Ph.D. in Algorithms, Combinatorics, and Optimization from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He was an Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh for four years prior to starting his current position in January 2008. His interests include linear and combinatorial optimization as well as computational aspects of operations research.

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Erin Claypool University of Pittsburgh

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Erin Claypool is a doctoral student of Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Industrial Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked for two years at MEDRAD, Inc, as a Manufacturing Engineer.

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Nuri Gokhan University of Pittsburgh

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Nuri Mehmet Gokhan is a recent Ph.D. graduate of Industrial Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. He received his B.S. in Industrial Engineering from the Istanbul Technical University and his Industrial Engineering M.S. from the Sabanci University. His primary research interests include supply chain planning, product design, operations research, and sustainable engineering.

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Scott Mason University of Arkansas

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Scott J. Mason is an Associate Professor and the Associate Department Head of Industrial Engineering at the University of Arkansas, as well as the Chair of Industrial Engineering Graduate Studies. He received his BSME and MSE degrees from The University of Texas at Austin and his PhD in Industrial Engineering from Arizona State University. Dr. Mason has published over 60 refereed journal articles, book chapters, and conference papers. His research and teaching interests include production planning, control, and scheduling (with emphasis in microelectronics manufacturing environments) and large-scale systems modeling, optimization, and algorithms (with emphasis in network and transportation logistics). He is a member of INFORMS and a senior member of the Institute for Industrial Engineers.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Integrating Design for Supply Chain Research into a Graduate Supply Chain Modeling Course – A Collaborative Approach

Abstract

An ongoing research project addresses the problem of how to effectively synchronize product design and supply chain design for new and existing products resulting in not only a good product design, but a supply chain that is cost effective, minimizes lead time and ensures quality. The research investigates the impacts of product design and redesign on the supply chain structure. The aim is to quantify those impacts so that they can be used in the product design phase to better understand the tradeoffs between the benefits and costs of different supply chain alternatives. This collaborative research effort between the National Science Foundation Center for e-Design (CED) and the National Science Foundation Center for Engineering Logistics and Distribution (CELDi) will result in a synergy that integrates the expertise from each center examining this extremely complex problem, which is referred to as Design for Supply Chain (DFSC). Results from this project are being incorporated real-time into an existing graduate course being taught at the Oklahoma State University entitled Supply Chain Modeling. This course is a third-semester graduate course where students must have a background in supply chain strategy, optimization modeling and discrete-event simulation modeling. The aim of the course is for the students to work as a development team that designs and develops an integrated user interface, database, optimization and simulation prototype for the purpose of analyzing supply chain structures. In the most recent semester, the class has expanded its scope to deal with the DFSC problem. The results of the class can be used as a test platform for researchers and practitioners to make design decisions that create better, more flexible and cost effective supply chains. This paper will focus on the integration of the research into the Supply Chain Modeling course, discuss outcomes, and the next steps of this ongoing effort.

1.0 Introduction

This research project addresses the problem of how to effectively synchronize product design and supply chain design for new and existing products. This concept is given the name Design for Supply Chain (DFSC). We use DFSC analogous to the Design for Manufacturability (DFM) concept of the 1980s where manufacturing processes of a product are taken into account in the product design phase. Academic studies and industry experiences showed the benefits of incorporating different aspects of the production phase into the product design process. In this research, we propose that conducting supply chain analysis during the product design phase has important benefits and needs to be investigated similar to how manufacturing is considered in the design phase in DFM.

Our main research hypothesis is that simultaneous (or parallel) product and supply chain design (as compared to sequential design where the product and supply chain designs are considered in sequence) leads to better performing supply chains for the associated products. It also helps reduce total production costs and lead times as well as increasing product quality and customer

Ingalls, R., & cornejo, M., & Methapatara, C., & Sittivijan, P., & Needy, K., & Norman, B., & Hunsaker, B., & Claypool, E., & Gokhan, N., & Mason, S. (2008, June), Integrating Design For Supply Chain Research Into A Graduate Supply Chain Modeling Course – A Collaborative Approach Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4131

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