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Integrating Engineering Economic Analysis Across The Engineering Curriculum

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering Economy Frontiers

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

8.731.1 - 8.731.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12054

Download Count

113

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Paper Authors

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James Wilson

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Kim Needy

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Karen Bursic

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1639

Integrating Engineering Economic Analysis Across the Engineering Curriculum

Karen M. Bursic, Kim LaScola Needy, James P. Wilson University of Pittsburgh

Abstract

A three-phased project is underway in the School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh that is aimed at integrating engineering economic analysis across the curriculum. In the first phase, an engineering economic analysis needs assessment was done. During the second phase of the project, the course content for the engineering economic analysis courses is being modified based on the needs assessment. The third phase will integrate the material into other courses in each of the school’s engineering disciplines by developing and making available (via the web) an Engineering Economic Analysis Template. In this paper, we will report on the current results of this project and propose that a similar project can be extended to other engineering schools across the country.

Introduction

Engineering economic analysis is a core engineering competency that plays a vital role in decisions made by engineers. This body of knowledge is currently not well integrated into the engineering curriculum at many schools and is predominantly taught as a separate course in isolation from other courses in which the concepts can (and should) be applied.

In the School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh a three-phased project is underway that is aimed at integrating engineering economic analysis across the curriculum. This research does not propose to advance the body of knowledge in the field of engineering economic analysis, rather it proposes to advance the awareness of the topic in other engineering disciplines and to more carefully integrate the material into the engineering curriculum. In the first phase, an engineering economic analysis needs assessment in the eight engineering disciplines on the University’s main campus (Oakland) and the engineering technology program at the Johnstown branch campus was done. The goals of this assessment were to identify the material in the current engineering economic analysis course content that was relevant to each discipline; identify any missing material in the current course content; identify courses in each discipline that would benefit from the integration of engineering economic analysis material; and identify example projects or decision situations in which a graduate of the discipline would be faced with an economic decision. During the second phase of the project, the course content for the engineering economic analysis courses is being modified based on the needs assessment. The third phase will integrate the material into other courses in each of the engineering disciplines by developing and making available (via the web) an Engineering Economic Analysis Template. The

Proceedings of the 2003American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Wilson, J., & Needy, K., & Bursic, K. (2003, June), Integrating Engineering Economic Analysis Across The Engineering Curriculum Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12054

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