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Integrating Entrepreneurship into Capstone Design: An Exploration of Faculty Perceptions and Practices

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation Division – Epicenter Session

Tagged Division

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation

Page Count

30

Page Numbers

26.990.1 - 26.990.30

DOI

10.18260/p.24327

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24327

Download Count

96

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Paper Authors

biography

Victoria Matthew VentureWell

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Victoria Matthew is Senior Program Officer for Faculty Development at VentureWell, where she plays a lead role in the Pathways to Innovation Program, Epicenter’s faculty development and engagement strategy. She designs in-person and online convenings, engages experts, and curates content that foster the Pathways faculty goals of integrating entrepreneurship and innovation into undergraduate engineering. Prior to joining VentureWell, Victoria worked for over a decade in higher education. She has designed, developed and managed degree, and certificate programs, and has experience as an online instructor, and mentor and trainer of other online instructors.

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biography

Thema Monroe-White SageFox Consulting Group

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Thema Monroe-White is a senior evaluation and research consultant at SageFox Consulting Group. Prior to joining SageFox, Thema worked as a researcher and evaluator in the areas of mental health, STEM education and commercialization. She has taught in the K-12 environment, served as an instructor and invited guest lecturer for courses in leadership, statistics and cross-cultural psychology at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Thema completed her Master's Degree in Developmental Psychology at Howard University and her PhD in Science, Technology and Innovation Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Ari Turrentine VentureWell

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Ari is in charge of survey administration for internal program evaluation on the research and evaluation team at VentureWell. Her duties also include survey creation, qualitative and quantitative data analysis, program logic model development, and evaluation coordination across various stakeholder groups. Most recently Ari held positions in Austin, Texas at OneStar Foundation as a Fellow on the Texas Connector project and at the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Lewis & Clark College in Psychology and a Master’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work.

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Angela Shartrand VentureWell

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Angela Shartrand is Director of Research and Evaluation at VentureWell, a non-profit higher education network that helps emerging scientists and engineers launch products and ventures that improve life for people and the planet. Since 2005, she has contributed to the growth and development of VentureWell's entrepreneurship and innovation initiatives, which include grants, competitions, faculty development, innovator training, and network building. In addition, she has collaborated on many NSF-funded projects that are advancing entrepreneurship education in STEM fields, including Epicenter and I-Corps(tm). She and her team are currently examining the experiences of innovators commercializing and scaling-up new technologies, products, and services, and are developing ways to assess the venture and product development status of innovation teams. She received her B.A. from Williams College, an Ed.M. from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology from Boston College.

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Amit Shashikant Jariwala Georgia Institute of Technology

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Dr. Jariwala is the Director of Design & Innovation for the School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech. He graduated with a Bachelors Degree in Production Engineering from the University of Mumbai, India with honors in 2005 and received Masters of Technology degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2007 from IIT Bombay, India. He was awarded a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Tech in 2013, with minors in Entrepreneurship. Dr. Jariwala has over nine years of research experience in modeling, simulation, engineering design, and manufacturing process development, with research focus on design of polymer based micro additive manufacturing process. During his Ph.D. studies, he was also a participant of the innovative TI:GER® program (funded by NSF:IGERT), which prepares students to commercialize high impact scientific research results. Dr. Jariwala has participated and led several research projects from funded by NSF, the State of Georgia and Industry sponsors. At Georgia Tech, he is responsible for enhancing corporate support for design courses, managing design and fabrication/prototyping facilities, coordinating the design competitions/expo and teaching design courses, with a strong focus on creating and enabling multidisciplinary educational experiences.

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Abstract

Integrating Entrepreneurship into Capstone Design: An Exploration of Faculty Perceptions and PracticesMany compelling reasons have been identified for incorporating entrepreneurship into theengineering curriculum. Ohland et al. (2004) found entrepreneurship education boosted GPA andretention rates. Byers et al. (2014) explained that entrepreneurship provides students with theskills and attitudes needed to innovatively contribute to existing organizations, as well as pursuetheir own ventures. Researchers have found that entrepreneurship is most effectively taught usingexperiential methods (Duval-Couetil, Shartrand, & Reed-Rhoads, in press), but these methods areones that faculty may find challenging to incorporate into core engineering classes. Given thatcapstone design courses are by nature applied and experiential, they may provide an optimalopportunity to integrate entrepreneurship.Ochs et al. (2006) illustrated ways to integrate entrepreneurship into capstone whilesimultaneously adhering to ABET standards. Based on a panel discussion that occurred during the2010 Capstone Design Conference, Shartrand and Weilerstein (2011) identified the followingpractices for incorporating entrepreneurship into capstone courses: (1) Develop anEntrepreneurial Mindset, (2) Provide Necessary Curricular Content and Support Scaffolding forEntrepreneurial Goals and Objectives, (3) Incorporate Authentic Deliverables, Constraints andFeedback into the Process, (4) Form Interdisciplinary Student Teams, (5) Allow Students toEngage Early and to Continue Post-Course, (6) Create Opportunities for Competition andExternal Validation, and (7) Facilitate Student Ownership of Intellectual Property.Building on this taxonomy developed by Shartrand and Weilerstein (2011) to categorizestrategies for integrating entrepreneurship into Capstone Design courses, the authors of this paperwill present survey data gathered from the Capstone Design Community designed to a)understand how and to what degree entrepreneurship is currently integrated into Capstone Designexperiences and b) identify faculty’s perceived and actual challenges to implementing thisinstructional practice into the Capstone Design experience. Strategies for addressing thesebarriers (e.g., the lack of a common definition of entrepreneurship, meeting the needs of industrysponsors, and alignment with ABET) will be explored. The authors conclude with recommendedsteps that faculty and administrators can take to foster greater integration of entrepreneurship intoCapstone Design courses.ReferencesByers, T., Seelig, T., Sheppard, S., & Weilerstein, P. (2013). Entrepreneurship: Its Role in Engineering Education. The Bridge, 43(2), 35–40. Retrieved from http://www.nae.edu/Publications/Bridge/81221/81235.aspxDuval-Couetil, N., Shartrand, A., & Reed-Rhoads, T. (in press). The role of entrepreneurship program models and experiential activities on engineering student outcomes. Advances in Engineering Education.Ochs, J., Lennon, G., Watkins, T., & Mitchell, G. (2006). A comprehensive model for integrating entrepreneurship education and capstone projects while exceeding ABET requirements. In Proceedings of the 2006 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition. Chicago, IL: American Society for Engineering Education. Retrieved from www.lehigh.edu/~taw4/LehighASEE2006.pdfOhland, M. W., Frillman, S. A., Zhang, G., Brawner, C. E., & Miller, T. K. I. (2004). Effect of an Entrepreneurship Program on GPA and Retention*, The. Journal of Engineering Education, 93(4), 293–301. Retrieved from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3886/is_200410/ai_n9470228Shartrand, A., & Weilerstein, P. (2011). Strategies to Promote Entrepreneurial Learning in Engineering Capstone Courses. International Journal of Engineering Education, 27(6), 1186.

Matthew, V., & Monroe-White, T., & Turrentine, A., & Shartrand, A., & Jariwala, A. S. (2015, June), Integrating Entrepreneurship into Capstone Design: An Exploration of Faculty Perceptions and Practices Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24327

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