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Integrating Lean Systems Education Into Manufacturing Course Curriculum Via Interdisciplinary Collaboration

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

12.920.1 - 12.920.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1761

Download Count

79

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Paper Authors

biography

Ning Fang Utah State University

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Ning Fang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Engineering and Technology Education, College of Engineering, Utah State University. His areas of interest include engineering education, manufacturing processes, and product design. He earned his PhD in Mechanical Engineering in 1994 and has published 30+ papers in refereed international journals. He is a member of ASEE, ASME, and a senior member of SME.

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biography

Randy Cook Utah State University

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Randy Cook is an Executive in Residence at Utah State University, with a joint appointment between the Shingo Prize and the Department of Business Administration. He holds a Ph.D. degree in Operations Management from Duke University and teaches operations management courses based upon lean principles, and also supports the Shingo Prize by conducting site examinations. He also consults and trains for companies in the areas of lean systems, quality and continuous improvement.

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Karina Hauser Utah State University

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Karina Hauser is an assistant professor in the Business Information Systems department at Utah State University. She received her PhD in Decision Science and Information Technology at the University of Kentucky on a Toyota Fellowship. Her research interests are Lean Manufacturing and the application of artificial intelligence techniques in the area of operations management. Before going into academia, Karina spent 16 years in industry as a programmer and consultant for Enterprise Resource Planning systems.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Integrating Lean Systems Education into Manufacturing Course Curriculum via Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Abstract

Lean systems have proven to be an effective strategy to increase productivity and cost competitiveness for many companies in the U.S. Lean systems are fundamentally the Toyota management model that utilizes significantly fewer resources to produce a larger variety of products at higher levels of product quality and service. Toyota’s success is renowned and is most often attributed to its management, engineering, and workforce being well-educated and highly-efficient in lean systems.

In this paper, we report our recent effort that focuses on integrating lean systems education into a manufacturing course curriculum at our university. At present, most lean manufacturing courses are taught either by engineering faculty alone or by business faculty alone. We take a more effective approach by forming an interdisciplinary faculty team to develop and co-teach a new Lean course at our university. Our team consists of faculty from both engineering and business and takes advantage of the expertise of each faculty member. The interdisciplinary nature of the course is beneficial to the students because they begin to see the necessity of coordinating the world of design (process design and product design) and process problem solving.

Our Lean course attracts student enrollment from five departments in the College of Engineering and the College of Business. Through interdisciplinary collaboration, we have designed and implemented two pedagogical approaches: a Lean Lego Simulation (LLS) and student-company team projects via close collaboration with the local companies. This paper introduces in detail how the two pedagogical approaches are performed and their impact on student learning with diversified background. The paper also describes the general framework and contents of our course. Both the experiences we have gained and the lessons we have learned are shared with the educational community in order to support continuous improvement to the Lean curriculum.

Background Introduction

The U.S. manufacturing industry has suffered in the recent economic recession. In 2001-2004, 2.7 million manufacturing jobs have left the U.S. to Mexico, Taiwan, China, Thailand, Malaysia, Eastern Europe, and South America 1. As an increasing number of U.S. companies are outsourcing manufacturing operations to foreign countries that have cheaper labor markets, the issues of keeping manufacturing jobs in America and increasing the competitiveness of the U.S. manufacturing industry have become critical to the long-term sustainable prosperity of the U.S. economy and its technological progress.

Lean systems (or lean manufacturing systems) have proven to be an effective strategy to increase productivity and cost competitiveness for many companies in the United States 2. Distinguished from traditional mass production systems, lean systems are fundamentally the Toyota management model that utilizes significantly fewer resources to produce a larger variety of products at higher levels of product quality and service 3,4. Toyota has achieved its renowned

Fang, N., & Cook, R., & Hauser, K. (2007, June), Integrating Lean Systems Education Into Manufacturing Course Curriculum Via Interdisciplinary Collaboration Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/1761

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