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Integrating Self Regulated Learning Instruction In A Digital Logic Course

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engaging Students in Learning

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

15.769.1 - 15.769.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15735

Download Count

46

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Paper Authors

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HuiRu Shih Jackson State University

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Dr. HuiRu (H.R.) Shih is a Professor of Technology at Jackson State University (JSU). He received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Missouri. Dr. Shih is a registered professional engineer and a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

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Wei Zheng Jackson State University

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Dr. Wei Zheng is an Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering at Jackson State University. He received his Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering from University of Wisconsin-Madison and has over 10-year industrial experience.

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Tzusheng Pei Jackson State University

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Dr. Tzusheng Pei is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Jackson State University. His research includes artificial neural networks application for transportation analysis and biological dendritic neural nets for recognizing patterns in a learning process.

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Gordon Skelton Jackson State University

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Dr. Gordon W. Skelton is an Associate Professor of Computer Engineering at Jackson State University. He is the founder and director of Center for Defense Integrated Data at JSU.

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Evelyn Leggette Jackson State University

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Dr. Evelyn Leggette is a Professor and Dean of Division of Undergraduate Studies at Jackson State University. She is the administrator for the First Year Experience Program at JSU and has expertise on advisement, assessment of curriculum enhancement project.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Integrating Self-Regulated Learning Instruction in a Digital Logic Course

Abstract

Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) involves self-monitoring and self-correction of three components of learning: motivation, behavior, and cognition. Abundant research has supported that optimal academic performance is strongly tied to the extent to which the learner uses SRL. SRL is currently viewed as a vital prerequisite for the successful acquisition of knowledge in school and beyond. Thus, teaching students self-regulatory skills in addition to subject-matter knowledge is one of the major goals of education. However, SRL is not well known and utilized by the Engineering and Technology education community for facilitating student learning. Self-regulated learners are purposive and goal-oriented, incorporating and applying a variety of strategies to optimize their academic performances. However, the application of self-regulation to learning is a complicated process involving not only the awareness and application of learning strategies but also extensive reflection and self awareness. This paper describes the development of the instructional strategy and its implementation plan, which integrates the SRL model through two instructional strategies (Direct Instruction and Immersion Instruction) into the Digital Logic course. The outcomes of the implementation are provided and discussed.

1. Introduction

According to national statistics, the number of bachelor-degree holders in Engineering and Technology (E&T) declined by 5% over the last decade. Only 5.6 % of the bachelor-degree awardees were from E&T in 20041. Based on the experience of working with students and the discussion among faculty members reveals that most of those students, who left the engineering and technology programs, possess the ability for achieving the required performance to succeed in the program. The specific reasons that resulted in their failing or dropping out are: (1) lack of motivation and interest in learning technology; (2) lack of good learning habits, strategies and efforts in their studies; and (3) lack of association with other engineering/technology students and faculty for seeking support. Most of the engineering/technology courses focus mainly on disciplinary topics. Little attention is given to help students develop cognitive skills that can effectively regulate learning efforts. Students who failed in their studies may attribute their failures to lack of ability in learning rather than a lack of effective use of strategies. They may quit from engineering and technology programs due to frustrations from their setback in learning. In addition, these courses lack instructional strategies to motivate those students who stay in the programs. Furthermore, possessing learning motivation and self-confidence is a critical prerequisite for students to apply effective strategies, persist in their effort, and eventually succeed in learning engineering and technology. Particularly, as students from minority groups are interested in E&T learning, the challenge is to believe they can succeed, as well as support and nurture their interest2. Thus, there is an imperative need to adapt and develop new instructional strategies that

Shih, H., & Zheng, W., & Pei, T., & Skelton, G., & Leggette, E. (2010, June), Integrating Self Regulated Learning Instruction In A Digital Logic Course Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/15735

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2010 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015