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Integrating Solid Modeling Throughout A Mechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

6.618.1 - 6.618.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9420

Download Count

121

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Paper Authors

author page

David Myszka

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3548

Integrating Solid Modeling Throughout a Mechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum David H. Myszka University of Dayton

Abstract

Over the past few years, the majority of companies involved in mechanical design have been migrating to a solid modeling system as the primary design platform. An broad study was conducted to document the specific details of using a solid modeling system in an industrial setting. As a result of this study, a comprehensive list of benefits was compiled. Also, the major obstacles, which must be faced as an organization adopts a solid modeling system, was documented.

The resulting objective was to propose a structured approach to integrate solid modeling into Mechanical Engineering Technology courses. The plan involves all courses, in the curriculum, that has a design component. This paper reviews the results of the solid modeling study. It also discuses the manner in which solid modeling has been integrated into the Mechanical Engineering Technology curriculum at the University of Dayton.

I. Introduction

The purpose of the study was to identify the specific details of using a solid modeling, CAD system in an industrial setting. The resulting objective was to propose a structured approach to integrate solid modeling into the Mechanical Engineering Technology courses. The work was divided into three phases:

1. The initial phase of the study involved an investigation into the evolution of computer-aided design (CAD). This phase involved investigating and documenting the specific capabilities of the different CAD software packages, both 2-D and 3-D. To accomplish this, numerous training sessions, involving different software packages, were attended.

2. The second phase involved a comprehensive review of the specific uses of solid modeling. To accomplish this, full time employment, in a design engineering capacity, was obtained at an industrial sponsor. The primary responsibility included designing special machines using a solid modeling system. As a result of this experience, a comprehensive list of benefits gained by using a solid modeling system was compiled. The obstacles that must be faced as an organization adopts a solid modeling system was also reviewed.

Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Myszka, D. (2001, June), Integrating Solid Modeling Throughout A Mechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9420

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