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Integration Of A Conceive Design Implement Operate (Cdio) Experience In A Sophomore Level Aerodynamics Course

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Innovative Techniques in Graphics

Tagged Division

Engineering Design Graphics

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

12.933.1 - 12.933.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2250

Download Count

88

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Paper Authors

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Priti Bhatnagar Daniel Webster College

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Priti Bhatnagar is a senior at Daniel Webster College enrolled in Aeronautical Engineering and Aviation Flight Operations pursing Bachelor’s Degrees. She is currently interning as a flight instructor at Daniel Webster. Her goal is to someday pursue a career as a test pilot. Email: bhatnagar_priti@dwc.edu

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Christopher McInnis Daniel Webster College

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Christopher M. McInnis is a junior at Daniel Webster College enrolled in Aeronautical Engineering, pursuing a Bachelors Degree. He has worked at SigArms, a firearm company, as a design engineer. He would like to continue his design work, following graduation, with a government contracted company. Email: mcinnis_christoper@dwc.edu

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Chad Hebert Daniel Webster College

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Chad D. Hebert is a junior at Daniel Webster College enrolled in Aeronautical Engineering. Prior to pursuing his degree, he specialized in the implementation of JIT and Lean Manufacturing techniques at a subcontract manufacturer for the communications and data storage industry. His goal is to be involved in the Automotive Motorsports industry following graduation. Mr. Hebert is also a Member of the Society of Automotive Engineers. Email: Hebert_Chad@dwc.edu

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Sonja Crowder Daniel Webster College

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Sonja M. Crowder is a junior at Daniel Webster College enrolled in Aeronautical Engineering, pursuing a Bachelors Degree. Currently she is a machine operator at UltraSource Inc. After receiving her BS degree at Daniel Webster, she intends to pursue a career in commercial space exploration. Email: crowder_sonja@dwc.edu

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David Guo Daniel Webster College

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David Guo is an assistant professor of aeronautical engineering at Daniel Webster College. He received his BSME in 1992 and his MSAE in 1995 from Beijing Institute of Technology, and his PhD of aerospace in 2005 from Old Dominion University. Since 2005, he has taught courses in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, aerodynamics, statics, and gas dynamics. His major interests are smart materials, nonlinear finite element method, and aerodynamics. Address: Engineering, Math, and Science Division, Daniel Webster College, 20 University Drive, Nashua, NH 03063-1300
Phone: 603-577-6639. Email: guo_david@dwc.edu

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Nicholas Bertozzi Daniel Webster College

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Nicholas Bertozzi is an Associate Professor of Engineering at Daniel Webster College and chair of the Engineering, Math, and Science Division. He received his BSME in 1977 and his MSME in 1982 from Northeastern University. Since 1982 he has taught courses in physics, differential equations, engineering design, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, aerodynamics, statics, dynamics, and strength of materials. His major interest over the past ten years has been the concurrent engineering design process. Mr. Bertozzi is a member of the ASEE. Address: Engineering, Math, and Science Division, Daniel Webster College, 20 University Drive, Nashua, NH 03063-1300
Phone: 603-577-6640. Email: bertozzi@dwc.edu

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Integration of a Conceive-Design-Implement-Operate (CDIO) Experience in a Sophomore-Level Aerodynamics Course

Abstract

The CDIO Initiative is a partnership for improving engineering education through a multidisciplinary hands-on curriculum, real-world applications, and communication skills. The formation of the CDIO Initiative was a response to feedback from industry surveys which communicated that although today’s engineering graduates are technically competent, they generally need one to two years of additional training before they are ready to function as engineers. Some of the common weaknesses cited are communication skills, including graphics, the ability to work in teams, and design skills. This paper will present a plan for a five-semester concurrent engineering design sequence, as well as an expanded use of design experiences in core engineering courses. Students will present an aerodynamics CDIO project that enhances their understanding of the effect of planform shape on finite wing performance and gives them additional experience with solid modeling, CAD/CAM, and analysis tools. Of particular interest will be an airfoil that is modeled after a humpback whale flipper and has bumps on the leading edge called tubercles.

I. Introduction

The CDIO Initiative (2006)1 started at M.I.T. and has gained national and international partners. The vision statement for CDIO states, “The CDIO Initiative offers an education stressing engineering fundamentals, set in the context of the Conceiving-Designing-Implementing- Operating process, which engineers use to create systems and products.” Unlike project-based education, which fills in content as it is needed to complete a particular project, the CDIO approach is to integrate and weave CDIO experiences throughout a more traditional content and skills-based curriculum.

The CDIO Website has a great deal of information about the CDIO philosophy of education. It includes the 12 CDIO Standards that, “define the distinguishing features of a CDIO program, serve as guidelines for educational program reform and evaluation, create benchmarks and goals with worldwide application, and provide a framework for continuous improvement.” It also includes the CDIO Syllabus Report, which gives guidance on creating a CDIO program, and the CDIO Syllabus (http://www.cdio.org/Cond_syl.html) to help instructors develop learning objectives and detailed content.

II. How Much CDIO is Enough?

Many engineering programs have moved a design experience into the freshman year; however, in some programs students do not have a significant design experience again until the senior year. The skills involved in the design process (solid modeling, analysis, simulation, CAD/CAM, rapid prototyping, testing, systems integration, documentation, and team work) should be learned, developed, and practiced throughout the undergraduate experience.

Bhatnagar, P., & McInnis, C., & Hebert, C., & Crowder, S., & Guo, D., & Bertozzi, N. (2007, June), Integration Of A Conceive Design Implement Operate (Cdio) Experience In A Sophomore Level Aerodynamics Course Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2250

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