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Integrative Design And Experimental Analysis: A Yearlong Laboratory Course In Biomedical Engineering

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Laboratories and Computer Simulation in BME

Tagged Division

Biomedical

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

12.940.1 - 12.940.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2477

Download Count

86

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Paper Authors

biography

Timothy Allen University of Virginia

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Dr. Timothy E. Allen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia. He received a B.S.E. in Biomedical Engineering at Duke University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Allen's teaching activities include coordinating the undergraduate teaching labs and capstone design courses in the BME department at the University of Virginia, and his research interests are in the fields of computational systems biology and genomics.

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biography

Brett Blackman University of Virginia

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Dr. Brett R. Blackman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Robert M. Berne Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Virginia. He received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering at Drexel University and a Ph.D. in Bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Blackman's teaching activities have focused on developing and teaching the undergraduate laboratory course in the BME department at the University of Virginia, and his research group is focused on identifying the basic cellular mechanisms of mechanotransduction resulting from blood flow in the cardiovascular system.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Integrative Design and Experimental Analysis: A Yearlong Laboratory Course in Biomedical Engineering

Abstract

Undergraduate degree programs in biomedical engineering and bioengineering require a very broad array of topics in engineering and biology if they are to adequately prepare graduates for the fast-growing biotech industry, as well as for graduate and professional school. To provide this breadth of expertise, BME programs typically include coursework in cell and molecular biology, physiology, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation (including signals and systems, circuits, and biomedical imaging analysis), biomechanics, transport phenomena, and mathematical modeling of BME systems in their core curricula. Given this breadth, however, there is a pressing need for not only providing sufficient practical depth in these topics through hands-on laboratory components, but also for allowing the students to integrate the concepts learned in these diverse courses towards solving real-world BME problems. Towards meeting these needs, we have developed a yearlong laboratory course that is required of all BME majors at the University of Virginia. This course is divided into 12 separate lab modules taught by eight different faculty members throughout the year, in accordance with their respective areas of expertise. BME-relevant applications and methods covered in this lab span the topics listed above, including cell culture, microscopy, RNA and protein extraction, western blotting, RT- PCR, biomaterials and tissue engineering, ultrasound, EKG, biomechanics, microfluidics, biofluid dynamics, and quantitative clinical measurement methodologies. The end of this course consists of a four-week project which empowers the students to integrate the skills and knowledge accumulated throughout the year towards independently addressing a relevant hypothesis or question in BME. Student lab proficiency and analytical ability were assessed via detailed group lab reports on each module, weekly quizzes, in-lab observation by the instructors and TAs, and a final written practicum exam. Additionally, feedback on the course was gathered from: 1) student evaluations, surveys, and individual interviews; 2) input from industry and professional school representatives; and 3) internal input from a majority of the faculty in our department. Over the first three years this course has been offered, assessment of student learning as well as feedback from all sources (which has been used to enhance and revise the lab modules as needed in successive years) have both been very positive. The laboratory course described in this paper thus represents a viable curricular means by which to provide students with not only the topical breadth but also the practical depth and integrative analysis necessary to prepare the next generation of biomedical engineers.

Introduction

The field of biomedical engineering (BME) is widely regarded as the fastest growing engineering discipline at most universities.1 Undergraduate curricula in BME must include a very broad array of topics in engineering and biology in order to adequately prepare graduates for the fast-growing biotech industry and for graduate and professional school. To provide this breadth of expertise, BME programs typically include coursework in cell and molecular biology, physiology, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation (including signals and systems, circuits, and biomedical imaging analysis), biomechanics, transport phenomena, and mathematical modeling

Allen, T., & Blackman, B. (2007, June), Integrative Design And Experimental Analysis: A Yearlong Laboratory Course In Biomedical Engineering Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2477

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