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Interactive Web Based Instructional Modules Concerning Human Joint Mechanics Using The Legacy Cycle

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

6.638.1 - 6.638.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9447

Download Count

19

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Paper Authors

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Robert Freeman

author page

Stephen Crown

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

1609

Interactive Web-based Instructional Modules concerning Human Joint Mechanics using the Legacy Cycle

Robert A. Freeman, Stephen W. Crown The University of Texas Pan-American

Abstract In this work we describe the integration of an interactive, web-based instructional approach with the Legacy Cycle learning algorithm for the investigation of human joint mechanics. The interactive web-based approach was developed as an instructional aid for an Engineering Graphics course and has repeatedly been used with great success. This approach is based on the use of Lotus ScreenCam tutorials and interactive exercises, games, and quizzes. The ScreenCam exercises interactively guide the student through examples using modeling software such as Working Model 2-D and MathCad. The instructional material is organized using the Legacy Cycle algorithm, which has been shown to be highly successful in K-12 instruction and is based on a sequence of challenges of increasing difficulty. An example demonstrating the delivery and instructional techniques used is given. The example deals with a simple, planar Hinge Joint model of the Human Elbow. The challenges begin with determining which of the three muscle groups (biceps, brachioradials, and brachialis) is most efficient with respect to muscle force magnitude for an isometric curl lift, and progress to the proposition of an appropriate load distribution scheme for the prediction of muscle-group activation force for an isometric curl lift. Introduction In this work we describe the integration of an interactive, web-based instructional approach with the Legacy Cycle learning algorithm for the investigation of a specific task involving human joint mechanics. The Legacy learning cycle1 is based on a sequence of contextually related challenges of increasing difficulty. A brief description of this cycle is given below in outline format with the italicized comments being the opinions of the authors.

Look ahead: The learning task and desired knowledge outcomes are described here. This step also allows for pre-assessment and serves as a benchmark for self-assessment in the Reflect Back step. Challenge 1: The first challenge is a lower difficulty level problem dealing with the topic. The student is provided with information needed to understand the challenge. The steps shown below represent the remainder of the cycle, which prepares the students to complete the challenge. a. Generate ideas: Students are asked to generate a list of issues and answers that they think are relevant to the challenge; to share ideas with fellow students; and to appreciate which ideas are “new” and to revise their list. b. Multiple perspectives: The student is asked to elicit ideas and approaches concerning this challenge from “experts”. Describing who came up with certain approaches and theorems and when they developed them can place historical perspective here. This

Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition, Copyright 2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Freeman, R., & Crown, S. (2001, June), Interactive Web Based Instructional Modules Concerning Human Joint Mechanics Using The Legacy Cycle Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9447

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