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Interdisciplinary Design: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Collaborative Projects in Architectural Engineering Education

Tagged Division

Architectural

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

15.791.1 - 15.791.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16260

Download Count

10

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Paper Authors

biography

Jill Nelson California Polytechnic State University

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Jill Nelson is an Assistant Professor for the Architectural Engineering Department at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) at San Luis Obispo, CA. Professor Nelson came to Cal Poly with over 25 years of structural design and project management experience. She is a registered Professional Engineer and Structural Engineer in the states of California and Washington. Jill Nelson received a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno and a M.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Washington.

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biography

Brent Nuttall California Polytechnic State University

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Brent Nuttall is an Associate Professor for the Architectural Engineering Department at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo. Until 2003, Professor Nuttall was a Vice President in the consulting structural engineering firm of Nabih Youssef & Associates in Los Angeles, California. He is registered Professional Engineer and Structural Engineer in California. Brent Nuttall received a B.S. degree in Architectural Engineering from California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo in 1986 and an M.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley in 1987.

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Allen Estes California Polytechnic State University

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Allen C. Estes is a Professor and Head for the Architectural Engineering Department at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. Until January 2007, Dr. Estes was the Director of the Civil Engineering Program at the United States Military Academy (USMA). He is a registered Professional Engineer in Virginia. Al Estes received a B.S. degree from USMA in 1978, M.S. degrees in Structural Engineering and in Construction Management from Stanford University in 1987 and a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1997.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Interdisciplinary Design: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

≠ Abstract

Today’s students are faced with far different challenges upon graduation than those encountered in past years. One of the most significant of these challenges is the need to work within the framework of integrated project delivery where all disciplines work as a cohesive team to produce a project. In 2004, the Construction Management Department at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo,CA began teaching a three credit hour design/build course focused on integrated project delivery. That course, taught primarily to construction management students, has now evolved into a true interdisciplinary experience that is taught in a team environment by professors from the departments of Construction Management, Architecture, and Architectural Engineering. The challenges in creating and executing such a course are immense and fall into three major areas; institutional, logistical and pedagogical. This paper addresses these three challenge areas by discussing the specific issues, both good and bad, associated with this course and how they were addressed. It includes assessment data from the course and cites some areas for improvement. In addition, the paper provides a framework for the successful implementation of similar courses around the world.

≠ Introduction

The Architectural Engineering Department (ARCE) at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) is one of the few ABET accredited engineering programs in the United States that exists outside a college of engineering. Housed in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design, ARCE resides with the departments of Architecture (ARCH), Construction Management (CM), Landscape Architecture, and City and Regional Planning. The college has a 60 year tradition of collaboration between the engineering, architecture and construction disciplines. Several decades ago, all students in the college took a common two year curriculum prior to separating into their respective disciplines. Although that model no longer exists, there is a commitment to interdisciplinary collaboration at the lower division level. ARCE students take three architecture studios side-by-side with architecture students. All ARCH and CM students take a five course structural engineering sequence from the ARCE Department. While the college has always excelled at bringing students together in lower division classes, there have only been isolated attempts to bring the students back together after each has learned his or her respective discipline for a true interdisciplinary experience. There have been many excellent elective courses and senior projects that have been interdisciplinary in nature, but no experience required of every student. This paper chronicles an attempt to bring an interdisciplinary experience to the masses – an upper division, project based, team oriented course that every student would take. The challenges in creating and executing such a course are immense and fall into three major areas: institutional, logistical and pedagogical. Institutional issues include university support and concurrence from four different department heads. Logistical issues range from finding open

Nelson, J., & Nuttall, B., & Estes, A. (2010, June), Interdisciplinary Design: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16260

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2010 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015