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Internal Combustion Engine Demonstrator For First Year Introduction To Engineering Laboratory Course

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Conference

2004 Annual Conference

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 20, 2004

Start Date

June 20, 2004

End Date

June 23, 2004

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

TIME 2: Laboratories

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

9.795.1 - 9.795.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/13758

Download Count

76

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Paper Authors

author page

Matthew Carr

author page

J. Steven Brown

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Internal Combustion Engine Demonstrator for First Year Introduction to Engineering Laboratory Course

J. Steven Brown1, Matthew A. Carr2

1 Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Ave, NE, Washington, DC 20064, brownjs@cua.edu / 2 Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, The United States Naval Academy, 590 Holloway Road (Stop 11C), Annapolis, MD 21402, macarr@usna.edu

Abstract

We describe a small, inexpensive four-stroke engine setup for an introductory engineering laboratory course. The setup includes instrumentation for atmospheric temperature, absolute atmospheric pressure, exhaust temperature, and exhaust differential pressure. Data collection is PC-based utilizing National Instrument’s LabVIEW software. With minor modifications and simple upgrades, the setup could be used in more advanced undergraduate engineering courses.

Introduction

The objective of this paper is to describe a small, inexpensive four-stroke engine setup. Inexpensive purchased parts and simple tools available in most machine shop facilities allow for fabrication of the setup. The original setup was for an “Introduction to Engineering Laboratory” course for first-year engineering undergraduate students at The Catholic University of America. Note that the overwhelming majority of these students did not have any prior knowledge or experience with engineering. With minor modifications and simple upgrades the device can be used throughout a typical undergraduate engineering curriculum.

First, we present material to motivate students to the importance of the study of internal combustion engines. This material is not complete or exhaustive. Its purpose is to give a sketchy overview of why the study of internal combustion engines is anything but a dead, unneeded undertaking. In addition, the material helps to address ABET Outcomes (h) and (j)1 by placing the study of internal combustion engines within a societal context and by addressing the major issues associated with this technology. We then describe the engine itself and some upgrades that allow its use in more advanced undergraduate engineering courses. A discussion on the safe operation of the engine follows. Finally, we present some sample results and draw some conclusions.

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

Carr, M., & Brown, J. S. (2004, June), Internal Combustion Engine Demonstrator For First Year Introduction To Engineering Laboratory Course Paper presented at 2004 Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/13758

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