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Introducing A Flexible Adaptation Framework For Implementing Learning Factory–Based Manufacturing Education

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

14.797.1 - 14.797.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/5025

Download Count

37

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Paper Authors

biography

Mukasa Ssemakula Wayne State University

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Dr. Ssemakula received his BS in Mechanical Engineering, MS in Manufacturing Technology, and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering all from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (England). After working in industry, he joined the faculty of the University of Maryland where he taught courses in the areas of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering as well as conducting research in Manufacturing Systems. Since 1993, he has been on the faculty of Wayne State University’s Division of Engineering Technology where he has been a leader in developing and implementing fresh pedagogical approaches to engineering education. He is currently teaching courses in Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering, and continuing his research in Manufacturing Systems.

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biography

Gene Liao Wayne State University

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Dr. Liao received the BSME from National Central University, Taiwan, MSME from the University of Texas, Mechanical Engineer from Columbia University, and the Doctor of Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is currently an associate professor at Wayne State University. He has over 15 years of industrial practices in the automotive sector prior to becoming a faculty member.

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biography

Darin Ellis Wayne State University

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Dr. Ellis received his PhD in Industrial Engineering from Penn State.
He is on the faculty of the Department of Industrial & Manufacturing
Engineering in the Wayne State University College of Engineering. He
has over 15 years of experience in the field of human factors and
ergonomics, specializing in human-computer interaction. His current
research is focused on human-robot interaction. In addition to his human-factors related
research he has interests in activity based learning and curriculum
development in industrial engineering.

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Kyoung-Yun Kim Wayne State University

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Dr. Kyoung-Yun Kim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Wayne State University. Prior to joining Wayne State in 2005, he held several positions at the University of Pittsburgh, including Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Industrial Engineering and Research Specialist at the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) for e-Design. Dr. Kim's research focuses on computational intelligence in CAD, collaborative product development, CAD/CAM, and telerehabilitation, Dr. Kim's education includes a B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Chonbuk National University, South Korea, and a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from University of Pittsburgh.

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Shlomo Sawilowsky Wayne State University

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Dr. Shlomo Sawilowsky, Professor of Evaluation and Research, is a WSU Distinguished Faculty Fellow, and Assistant Dean in the College of Education. His areas of expertise are in Monte Carlo simulation methods; nonparametic, robust, permutation, and exact statistics; classical measurement theory; and research and experimental design. His Ph. D. is in Educational Statistics, Measurement, and Research is from the University of South Florida.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

INTRODUCING A FLEXIBLE ADAPTATION FRAMEWORK FOR IMPLEMENTING ‘LEARNING FACTORY’ – BASED MANUFACTURING EDUCATION

1. Introduction The Learning Factory (LF) model was first developed as part of the TRP/NSF funded Manufacturing Engineering Education Partnership with the goal of developing a practice-based engineering curriculum that balances analytical and theoretical knowledge with integrated physical facilities for product realization in an industrial-like setting1-2. The model has been successfully implemented in several other institutions3. However, full implementation of the LF model can be expensive. In 2002, Wayne State University was awarded an NSF grant to develop an adaptation of the LF model that would be less costly to implement. This goal was achieved by introducing the use of coordinated hands-on projects in standard laboratory settings across selected courses, using a model engine as the unifying theme4-6. This proved to be a more cost- effective way to give students hands-on experience in a range of issues involved in product realization.

The lack of hands-on experiences in specific manufacturing processes has been identified as one of the major competency gaps in manufacturing engineering education. In 1997, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) launched its Manufacturing Education Plan (MEP) to address key engineering competency gaps of new graduates that it had identified7. The gaps identified in 1997 were revised in 1999 and revised further in 2002-03. The latest rankings are shown in Table 1. (Note: higher ranking indicates larger competency gap and greater need.) Since the institution of the MEP, SME has funded more than $15 million for diverse projects throughout the nation to expand and improve manufacturing, engineering, science, and technology education so as to help close these competency gaps.

Table 1: Ranked SME Competency Gaps

1. Business knowledge/skills 2. Supply chain management 3. Project management 4. International perspective 5. Materials 6. Manufacturing process control 7. Written & oral communication 8. Product/process design 9. Quality 10. Specific manufacturing processes 11. Manufacturing systems 12. Problem solving 13. Teamwork/working effectively with others 14. Personal Attributes 15. Engineering fundamentals

In 2008, Wayne State University was awarded a follow-on NSF grant to broaden the implementation of the results from the first award. The goal of the current project is to distill a core of course-level learning outcomes from our previous work and develop an approach for mapping these to higher program-level outcomes that help to meet industry-defined competency gaps. We are taking the successful approach of using coordinated hands-on activities across

Ssemakula, M., & Liao, G., & Ellis, D., & Kim, K., & Sawilowsky, S. (2009, June), Introducing A Flexible Adaptation Framework For Implementing Learning Factory–Based Manufacturing Education Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/5025

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