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Introducing Biomedical Engineering Content Into Biological Engineering Courses

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

4.343.1 - 4.343.5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7780

Download Count

31

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Paper Authors

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S. Andrew Hale

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Roger Rohrbach

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Larry Stikeleather

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John Parsons

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James Young

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Susan M. Blanchard

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1608

Session 1608

Introducing Biomedical Engineering Content into Biological Engineering Courses

Susan M. Blanchard, John E. Parsons, S. Andrew Hale, Larry F. Stikeleather, James H. Young, Roger P. Rohrbach

Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Abstract

The Biological Engineering (BE) degree program in the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering at NC State University offers concentrations in Agricultural, Biomedical, Bioprocess, and Environmental Engineering. Enrollment in the BE degree program has grown markedly since it was introduced in Fall 1994 with students in the Biomedical Engineering Concentration now making up nearly 70% of the students. This broad range of concentrations and shift in student interests has resulted in several changes in course content. Many required courses now routinely include biomedical as well as agricultural examples. Future plans include the development of an ABET-accredited B. S. in Biomedical Engineering in addition to the B. S. in Biological Engineering so that the needs of the two student populations can be better served.

Introduction

In 1994, the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering at NC State University changed from offering a Biological and Agricultural Engineering (BAE) degree with concentrations in Biological, Environmental/Soil and Water, Food, and Power and Machinery, which was ABET-accredited under the guidelines for agricultural engineering programs, to a degree in Biological Engineering (BE) that followed the ABET guidelines for biological engineering. The revised curriculum offered students a choice of four concentration areas: Agricultural, Biomedical, Bioprocess, and Environmental Engineering. The revised degree program reflected the facultyÀs vision that biological engineering will play an important role in engineering activities in the 21 st century and was also a response to declining enrollments that began in the late 1980s. The goal of the revised undergraduate curriculum was to provide students with a broad-based, biologically oriented education while training them to be competent engineers. The four concentration areas were selected based on faculty research

Hale, S. A., & Rohrbach, R., & Stikeleather, L., & Parsons, J., & Young, J., & Blanchard, S. M. (1999, June), Introducing Biomedical Engineering Content Into Biological Engineering Courses Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/7780

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