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Introducing Biotechnology Manufacturing Through Electives

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Manufacturing Education Curriculum I

Tagged Division

Manufacturing

Page Count

6

Page Numbers

12.960.1 - 12.960.6

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3008

Download Count

35

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Paper Authors

biography

Wing Chan Alabama A&M University

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Dr. Wing Chan is currently an assistant professor at the School of Engineering Technology at Alabama A&M University. Prior to joining Alabama A&M University in the fall of 2004, he was a robotic engineer at Research Genetics, Inc. Dr. Chan received his Ph. D. from the University of Alabama in Huntsville in 1995 in Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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biography

Peter Romine Alabama A&M University

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Dr. Peter L. Romine is currently the Chairman of the Department of Technology at Alabama A&M University. He received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. He received his M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Introducing Biotechnology Manufacturing Through Electives

Abstract – The Technology Department at Alabama A&M University (AAMU) is developing courses for a Biotechnology Manufacturing elective area. The biotechnology field has much promise to grow rapidly in the region and nation. Huntsville, Alabama, is on its way to becoming a leader in the biotechnology industry with the construction of the Hudson-Alpha Institute for Biotechnology (HAIB) in Huntsville. The institute will contain state-of-the-art laboratories for biotechnology and is expected to attract many new industries to the area. The institute is expected to employ some 400 scientists and staff when it opens in mid-2007. The Technology Department at AAMU has developed several new courses to better equip graduates with the knowledge and skills to design, maintain, and operate biotechnology devices (or systems). The primary objective of the Biotechnology Manufacturing elective area will be to produce graduates that will have the knowledge in biogenetics and up-to-date technology to support this industry efficiently. This paper will discuss some of the essential elements of courses to support Biotechnology Manufacturing.

Keywords: Hudson-Alpha Institute for Biotechnology (HAIB), Biotechnology Manufacturing.

Introduction

Huntsville, Alabama, is one of the best-known “high-tech” cities in the nation with the highest per capita income in the Southeast [1]. As “America’s space capital,” technology, space, and defense industries have a major presence here with the Army's Redstone Arsenal, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, and Cummings Research Park. However, in the near future, Huntsville will not be only known for its space and defense industries; it will also be known as one of the important biotechnology cities in the nation. This is all because of biotechnology pioneer Jim Hudson’s vision of creating an institute – Hudson-Alpha Institute for Biotechnology (HAIB).

In August 2005, Alabama officials formally announced the location of the Hudson-Alpha Institute for Biotechnology (HAIB) in Cummings Research Park (CRP) in Huntsville, Alabama, and the creation of a 120-acre biotechnology site to be named the CRP Biotech Campus. When completed in mid-2007, the HAIB will be the second-largest biotechnology institute located on the second-largest biotechnology campus in the nation [2]. The institute will contain state-of- the-art laboratories for biotechnology and is expected to employ some 400 scientists and staff upon opening. According to Jim Hudson, institute founder and president, the institute is expected to employ 900 at full capacity. The property, sold by the City of Huntsville, is large enough to accommodate new buildings for companies that outgrow their space in the institute. Hudson estimates that the overall campus could employ 1,600 within ten years with an annual payroll of $83 million [3]. The institute has recruited eight biotech companies, many with previous affiliations with Hudson and based in Huntsville, to move into the facility: Applied Genomics, Expression Genetics, Genaco Biomedical Products, New Century Pharmaceuticals, Open Biosystems, Operon Biotechnologies, SourceCF, and Nektar Therapeutics [4].

Chan, W., & Romine, P. (2007, June), Introducing Biotechnology Manufacturing Through Electives Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/3008

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2007 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015