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Introducing Community Service Learning Pedagogy Into Two Engineering Curriculums At California State University, Northridge

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Conference

2002 Annual Conference

Location

Montreal, Canada

Publication Date

June 16, 2002

Start Date

June 16, 2002

End Date

June 19, 2002

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Design for Community

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

7.743.1 - 7.743.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/11012

Download Count

30

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Paper Authors

author page

Tarek Shraibati

author page

Ahmad Sarfaraz

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Main Menu Session 2625

Introducing Community Service-Learning Pedagogy into two Engineering Curriculums at California State University, Northridge

Ahmad R. Sarfaraz, Tarek Shraibati California State University, Northridge

Abstract

Academic service learning is a pedagogical model through which students learn, develop, and apply academic knowledge to address the real life needs of their local communities. It is becoming increasingly important in higher education. More recently, it has been used as an effective pedagogy for engineering education. Thus, in the spring of 2001, community service- learning concept was introduced into two Manufacturing Systems Engineering senior courses at California State University, Northridge (CSUN). In the first community service-learning project, students shared their knowledge and skills gained in a senior level course, Facilities Planning and Design, with a small company located within a federal enterprise zone. The second community service-learning project integrated a senior design class with a local high school as part of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) robotics organization. Engineering students mentored Granada Hills High School (GHHS) senior students in building a robot to compete in both regional and national FIRST robotics events. Through these projects, engineering students not only applied the knowledge and skills gained through academic study to real-world problem solving, but also appreciated the connections made between their academic work and real-world activities. The experience and motivation of the instructors in incorporating service-learning are discussed in this paper.

Introduction

Service-learning, when integrated with community development, provides students an opportunity to learn, develop, and apply academic skills to address the real needs of their local communities. Students are exposed to the challenge of working with people from different backgrounds, cultures, and ages. They will also be prepared to work under time constraints and to be aware of life issues. It is becoming increasingly important in higher education. In July 1999, Gray Davis, governor of California, called for a community service requirement for all students enrolled in California’s public institutions of higher education. His primarily goals were to enable students to give back to their communities, to experience the satisfaction of contributing to those who they need help, and to strengthen an ethic of service among graduates of California universities. Through previous academic year, California State University, Northridge (CSUN) has been given some grants to support the development of new service- learning courses and infrastructure. Thus, in spring of 2001, two senior courses in the department of Manufacturing Systems Engineering and Management (MSEM) were used as the first attempt

Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright Ó 2002, American Society for Engineering Education

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Shraibati, T., & Sarfaraz, A. (2002, June), Introducing Community Service Learning Pedagogy Into Two Engineering Curriculums At California State University, Northridge Paper presented at 2002 Annual Conference, Montreal, Canada. https://peer.asee.org/11012

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