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Introducing Materials Engineering Concepts In A High School Automotive Technology Class

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Trends in Engineering Education Poster Session

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

11.833.1 - 11.833.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1198

Download Count

25

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Paper Authors

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Devdas Pai North Carolina A&T State University

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DEVDAS M. PAI is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at NC A&T State University and Associate Director of the Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures. He teaches manufacturing processes and tribology related courses. A registered Professional Engineer in North Carolina, he serves on the Mechanical PE Exam Committee of the National Council of Examiners for Engineers and Surveyors and is active in several divisions of ASEE and in ASME.

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Gukan Rajaram North Carolina A&T State University

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GUKAN RAJARAM is a PhD student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He received the B.E. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Madurai Kamaraj University, and his MS in Metallurgical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology – Madras. His doctoral research is in the area of electrode and electrolyte synthesis and characterization for solid oxide fuel cells. He has been involved in teaching undergraduate mechanical engineering lab courses.

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Ricky Lewis Northeast Guilford High School

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RICKY LEWIS is an instructor in the Automotive Technology Program at Northeast Guilford High School in McLeansville, NC.

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Oliver Lewis North Carolina A&T State University

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Oliver Lewis is a junior undergraduate student in the School of Technology at NC A&T State University and an alumnus of Northeast Guilford High School. He has worked closely with Northeast's Ricky Lewis in doing the experimental part of this paper.

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Cindy Waters North Carolina A&T State University

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CINDY WATERS is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at NC A&T State University. She earned her B.S. and M.S. in Materials Science from Virginia Tech and her PhD. in Mechanical Engineering at NC A&T State University. Her research interests include advanced materials, thin films and biomaterials.

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Jagannathan Sankar North Carolina A&T State University

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JAG SANKAR is University Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering at NC A&T State University and Director of the University’s Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures. He received his Ph.D. from Lehigh University. He conducts research and teaches courses related to advanced materials.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Introducing Materials Engineering Concepts In a High School Automotive Technology Class

Introduction

In an effort to motivate high school students to consider future career opportunities in engineering and to appreciate the importance of engineering technology in creating a pollution- free environment, an educational outreach program was developed as a partnership between a university. The program is designed to create awareness among students about the environment, the potentials hazards it could face from humankind and the possible methods to alleviate the problem.

The idea has been executed in a high school automotive technology class where students work hands-on with automotive engines. One of the experiments was to measure the exhaust emissions. Automotive exhaust has been of great concern in recent years due to its dramatic impact on the environment. Much research has been done on exhaust emission systems in order to control the levels of the potentially toxic components of exhaust gases. A major breakthrough in the exhaust emission systems was the invention of catalytic pollution control system. Commercial applications of catalytic pollution control from internal combustion engines were virtually nonexistent 40 years ago when the first volume of the Journal of Catalysis was published [1]. Today, exhaust catalysts are found on nearly all US passenger cars, light- and medium-duty trucks, and even some heavy-duty trucks. The history of catalytic exhaust gas after-treatment — the largest application of heterogeneous catalysis by many measures — is a complex one, involving numerous players (automobile manufacturers, government agencies, catalyst suppliers, petroleum refiners, and fuel-additive suppliers, among others). Their contributions go far beyond advances in catalyst technology alone, and several detailed reviews have been published that cover the broad waterfront of automotive emissions control [2–9]. The catalytic advancement is through constant analysis of the exhaust gas using gas analyzers and the spectrometers. There are several different technologies used for gas analysis, but most exhaust gas analyzers built for shop use are infrared detectors. They work by measuring the infrared (IR) energy absorption of the exhaust gas. Energy radiates in different frequencies or wavelengths. The longest waves are radio frequencies; microwaves are the next shorter frequency, then infrared, followed by visible light. Though its wavelength is too long for our eyes to detect, IR energy is often referred to as infrared light because it behaves the same way; it is reflected by a mirror and is blocked - or more accurately, absorbed by non-reflecting surfaces. A simple example for the gas analyzer is the spectrometer.

A spectrometer is an optical instrument for measuring properties of light. The measured variable is often the light intensity but could also be the polarization state, for instance. The independent variable is often the wavelength of the light, usually expressed as some fraction of a meter. Spectrometer is a term that is applied to instruments that operate over a very wide range of wavelengths, from gamma rays and X-rays into the far infrared.

Pai, D., & Rajaram, G., & Lewis, R., & Lewis, O., & Waters, C., & Sankar, J. (2006, June), Introducing Materials Engineering Concepts In A High School Automotive Technology Class Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/1198

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015