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Introducing Renewable Energy Education Into Engineering Technology Program

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Trends in Engineering Education Poster Session

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

12.975.1 - 12.975.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2863

Download Count

49

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Paper Authors

biography

Youakim Al Kalaani Georgia Southern University

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Youakim Al Kalaani graduated from Cleveland State University with MS and Doctoral degrees in electrical engineering with a concentration in power systems. He is a member of IEEE and ASEE professional organizations and has research interest in electric power generation, renewable energy, unit scheduling, and optimization. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Technology Department at Georgia Southern University.

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Kurt Rosentrator USDA

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Introducing Renewable Energy Education into An Engineering Technology Program

Abstract

This paper presents the first stage to implement green energy education into an engineering technology program making use of a solar power generation station. As issues such as climate change, global warming, increased blackouts, and oil price fluctuation continue to pepper the news, it is likely that the use of renewable energy will become an increasing national priority that will affect the next generation of college students. It is apparent that there is still a widespread lack of understanding about the benefits of using alternative energy sources. As such, there is clearly a need to educate the community about sustainable energy and our institution provides an excellent venue for reaching a large audience in creative and effective ways. The solar system will serve as a demonstration platform for educating undergraduate students about contemporary renewable energy theory and technology. Key to this educational strategy is the development of projects that can assist in educating students in all aspects of renewable energy, thus, raising public awareness of the requirement to protect the environment.

Introduction

A trademark of the United States’ economic growth is an ever-increasing demand for energy, which has traditionally been met primarily by combusting the hydrocarbons found in fossil fuels. As national security and environmental concerns grow, renewable energy resources are gaining increased attention. Unfortunately, there is currently a lack of renewable energy coverage in engineering and technology curricula. Even with the progressive developments of non-traditional energy sources over the years, the U.S. still receives more than 90% of its energy from fossil and nuclear fuels. However, the use of renewable energy is increasing with applications including green power generation for homes, cottage industries, health clinics, and community centers. Illinois has abundant solar and wind resources and students will soon be asking for more curricular support in this area.

As issues such as climate change, global warming, increased blackouts, and oil price fluctuation continue to pepper the news 1-3, it is likely that the use of renewable energy will become an increasing national priority that will affect the next generation of college students4. Indeed, a statewide survey5 has found that the vast majority of American residents want to see more use and development of renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. However, it is apparent6 that there is still a widespread lack of understanding about the benefits of using alternative energy sources. As such, there is clearly a need to educate the public of sustainable energy and our institution provides the best venue for reaching a large audience in creative and effective ways.

An enormous benefit of “green” power is its impact on air quality and other aspects of the environment. According to the US government's Energy Information Administration, over one fourth of the air pollution produced by burning fossil fuels is a by-product of electric power production. Acid rain caused by emissions of sulfur dioxide during the burning of coal and oil,

Al Kalaani, Y., & Rosentrator, K. (2007, June), Introducing Renewable Energy Education Into Engineering Technology Program Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2863

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