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Introducing Universal Design Concepts In An Interdisciplinary Laboratory Project

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Design in the BME Curriculum

Tagged Division

Biomedical

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

13.806.1 - 13.806.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4037

Download Count

113

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Paper Authors

biography

Judy Cezeaux Western New England College

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Judy Cezeaux is Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Western New England College in
Springfield, Massachusetts. She received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 1984 and a Ph.D. degree in biomedical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1989. Prior to her appointment at Western New England College, she was a Senior Staff Fellow at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in Morgantown, West Virginia. Her research interests are engineering education, rehabilitation engineering, physiological effects of vibration, and tissue engineering.

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Thomas Keyser Western New England College

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Thomas Keyser is an Associate Professor and Chairman of the Industrial Engineering Department at Western New England College in Springfield, Massachusetts. Dr. Keyser received his Ph.D. degree from Clemson University, his M.S. degree from Colorado State University and his B.S.
from New Mexico State University. His research interests include simulation, quality engineering, and applied optimization.

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biography

Eric Haffner Western New England College

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Eric Haffner is Interim Dean of Engineering and Professor of Industrial Engineering at Western New England College in Springfield, Massachusetts. Dr. Haffner received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, his M.S. degree from Illinois Institute of Technology and his B.Ed. from Keene State College. His research interests include engineering education, product realization, design methodologies, facility layout, and production system design.

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Anne Kaboray Goodwill Industries of the Springfield/Hartford Area, Inc.

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Anne Kaboray is the Supervisor of Rehabilitation at Goodwill Industries of the Springfield/Hartford Area, Inc.

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Carol Hasenjager Goodwill Industries of the Springfield/Hartford Area, Inc.

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Carol Hasenjager is the Program Director of Employment Support Services at Goodwill
Industries of the Springfield/Hartford Area, Inc.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Introducing Universal Design Concepts in an Interdisciplinary Laboratory Project Abstract

Design for individuals with disabilities has been used by many institutions as a way to teach the design process to undergraduate students. These design projects often involve the design of an assistive device for a single individual to facilitate a particular task. The departments of biomedical engineering and industrial engineering at Western New England College have further developed an interdisciplinary laboratory design experience that involves the design of assistive technologies for workers performing light manufacturing work at Goodwill Industries of the Springfield/Hartford Area, Inc. Rather than focus on the design of assistive technology to increase the participation of a single worker with disabilities, students were tasked to develop devices to modify steps in a manufacturing process in an effort to maximize the number of workers with disabilities able to participate in each of the manufacturing steps. To facilitate the design process, biomedical and industrial engineering students were introduced to the concepts of universal design, the primary tenet of which is that products should be designed so that they can be used by the greatest number of consumers.

Introduction

Many institutions have used the design of assistive technologies for individuals with disabilities as a method by which students learn the design process. Such design experiences commonly occur in first year introduction to design courses 1, 2 and capstone design courses. 3, 4, 5 Faculty members in biomedical engineering and industrial engineering at Western New England College have previously described a 5-week design experience,6 based on the NISH National Scholar Award for Workplace Innovation & Design,7 that provided an opportunity for students to design assistive technologies for workers with disabilities at Goodwill Industries of the Springfield/Hartford Area, Inc., a local nonprofit agency performing light manufacturing work. These projects were completed in interdisciplinary teams as requirements in senior biomedical engineering and industrial engineering laboratory courses, rather than in the formal capstone design courses for each of the departments. A description of the second offering of this design experience is the subject of this paper.

The design experience has been modified in several ways. First, the experience spanned the entire semester, rather than a 5-week segment. Students in the biomedical engineering and industrial engineering senior laboratory courses (BME 405 Biomedical Engineering Senior Laboratory and IE 428 Industrial Design Laboratory III) participated on interdisciplinary teams for the design and development of the assistive devices in parallel with other assignments in their respective laboratory courses. Industrial engineering students in IE 428 also performed experiments on material handling, capacity planning, and line balancing, while biomedical engineering students also designed and performed physiological case-control studies as a component of BME 405. Secondly, because the goal of the NISH National Scholar Award is to foster innovation in the design of assistive technologies to increase the participation of individuals with disabilities in the workforce, it was important in the design to incorporate features that could maximize the number of workers able to participate in the manufacturing

Cezeaux, J., & Keyser, T., & Haffner, E., & Kaboray, A., & Hasenjager, C. (2008, June), Introducing Universal Design Concepts In An Interdisciplinary Laboratory Project Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4037

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