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Investigation of Probabilistic Multiple-Choice in a Structural Design Course

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Notable Topics in Civil Engineering Education

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Page Count

17

DOI

10.18260/p.25492

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/25492

Download Count

47

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Paper Authors

biography

Adrian Owen Biggerstaff P.E. U.S. Military Academy

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Major Adrian Biggerstaff is an Assistant Professor at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY. He received his B.S. from the United States Military Academy, and M.S. degrees from Stanford University and Missouri University of Science and Technology. He is a member of ASEE and is a registered Professional Engineer in Missouri. His primary research interests include sustainable design, construction engineering, and engineering education.

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biography

Brad Wambeke P.E. United States Military Academy

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Lieutenant Colonel Brad Wambeke is the Civil Engineering Design Group Director at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY. He received his B.S. from South Dakota State University; M.S. from the University of Minnesota; and Ph.D. from North Carolina State University. He is a member of ASEE and is a registered Professional Engineer in Missouri. His primary research interests include construction engineering, lean construction, and engineering education.

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Abstract

Student assessment is a critical part of the learning process. Engineering courses often use objective student assessments to promote impartiality and grading efficiency, but many objective assessment methods do not provide educators sufficient information on their students’ level of knowledge. The probabilistic multiple-choice question is a type of objective assessment that uses a ‘reproducing scoring system’ which encourages students to ‘reproduce’ their true knowledge state. The paper explores whether or not probabilistic multiple-choice assessments give students greater insight into their level of understanding prior to submitting their assignment, if it encourages students to more thoroughly understand the material being assessed, and if the students’ ability to assess their level of confidence in technical areas is increased. Presently, the authors are unaware of any attempts to use probabilistic multiple-choice assessments in undergraduate civil engineering courses. This paper examines the impact of using probabilistic multiple-choice questions on students in CE404: Design of Steel and Wood Structures. Student performance on several assignments is compared to the previous year when probabilistic multiple-choice was not used. Impacts on student critical thinking, self-assessment, confidence, and self-learning are also addressed.

Biggerstaff P.E., A. O., & Wambeke, B. (2016, June), Investigation of Probabilistic Multiple-Choice in a Structural Design Course Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.25492

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