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‘Is Someone in Your Family an Entrepreneur?’: Examining the Influence of Family Role Models on Students’ Entrepreneurial Self-efficacy and its Variation Across Gender

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation Division Technical Session 2

Tagged Division

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29647

Download Count

27

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Paper Authors

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Prateek Shekhar University of Michigan Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6552-2887

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Prateek Shekhar is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Michigan. His research is focused on examining translation of engineering education research into practice and evaluation of dissemination initiatives and educational programs in engineering disciplines. He holds a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, M.S. in Electrical Engineering from University of Southern California and B.S. in Electronics and Communication Engineering from India.

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Aileen Huang-Saad University of Michigan

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Aileen is faculty in Engineering Education and Biomedical Engineering. Previously, Aileen was the Associate Director for Academics in the Center for Entrepreneurship and was responsible for building the Program in Entrepreneurship for UM undergraduates, co-developing the masters level entrepreneurship program, and launching the biomedical engineering graduate design program. Aileen has received a number of awards for her teaching, including the Thomas M. Sawyer, Jr. Teaching Award, the UM ASEE Outstanding Professor Award and the Teaching with Sakai Innovation Award. Prior to joining the University of Michigan faculty, she worked in the private sector gaining experience in biotech, defense, and medical device testing at large companies and start-ups. Aileen’s current research areas include entrepreneurship engineering education, impact and engaged learning. Aileen has a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, a Doctorate of Philosophy from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a Masters of Business Administration from the University of Michigan Ross School of Business. Aileen is also a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Beta Sigma Gamma.

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Julie Libarkin

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Dr. Libarkin is a Professor of Geoscience Education at Michigan State University in the Department of Earth and Environment Sciences and CREATE for STEM Institute for Research on Science and Mathematics Education. Currently, her research focuses on cognition, assessment of student learning, validity and reliability in research, curriculum and visual design, and discipline-based education research.

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Anastasia Katharine Ostrowski University of Michigan

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Anastasia Ostrowski graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in Biomedical Engineering where she worked with the Daly Design and Engineering Education Research Group and Transforming Engineering Education Laboratory. Her research focused on entrepreneurship self-efficacy and understanding how biomedical engineering students engage in idea generation. She currently works at the MIT Media Lab in the Personal Robots Group conducting user studies related to social connectedness and robots.

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Abstract

Universities and institutions of higher education are increasingly introducing programs to expose undergraduate engineering students to entrepreneurship. However, there is a lack of research examining different factors that might impact student success and learning in these entrepreneurship education programs. Our study focuses on one such factor, Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy (ESE), which is described as an individual’s confidence in his/her ability to perform different entrepreneurship-related tasks. ESE is widely being used as an important metric to assess student outcomes in entrepreneurship programs, particularly due to past research and theoretical support that recognizes ESE as a critical influencer of entrepreneurial intention. In addition, researchers have indicated that this ESE may be mediated by the presence of entrepreneur role models in students’ family and this mediating influence may differ across gender. However, these studies have been conducted in business and psychology courses. There is minimal work examining the influence of family role models on students’ ESE and differences of the influence across gender in engineering entrepreneurship programs. Furthermore, these studies have examined just general ESE and not the influence on different ESE sub-constructs. Using McGee’s validated ESE scale, we examined the influence of family role models on students’ five ESE constructs and differences across gender. The study was conducted in a senior-level entrepreneurship course in Fall 2016 and Winter/Spring 2017 semesters at a large research university located in the United States (US). In this paper, using descriptive statistics, bivariate Pearson correlation and hierarchical linear regression analysis, we present an examination of differences in ESE scores and statistically significant interactions of our dependent variables (searching, planning, marshaling, implementing people and implementing finance) with our two independent variables (gender and family role model). Our results show that overall, students with an entrepreneur in their family reported higher ESE for all the five constructs than students who did not have an entrepreneur in their family. However, statistically significant differences and interactions with gender were found for only searching, marshaling and implementing finance constructs. For searching, both the independent variables (family role models and gender) were noted as significant predictors. In contrast, only presence of family role models was found to be a statistically significant predictor for marshalling. Similarly, only gender was significant predictor for implementing finance. These findings show that presence of role model has different influence on ESE associated with different entrepreneurship-related tasks and this influence further varies across gender. Detailed results of analysis are presented in the paper and implications for entrepreneurship education are discussed.

Shekhar, P., & Huang-Saad, A., & Libarkin, J., & Ostrowski, A. K. (2018, June), ‘Is Someone in Your Family an Entrepreneur?’: Examining the Influence of Family Role Models on Students’ Entrepreneurial Self-efficacy and its Variation Across Gender Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/29647

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