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JTF Web-Enabled Faculty and Student Tools for More Effective Teaching and Learning Through Two-Way, Frequent Formative Feedback

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees’ Poster Session

Tagged Division

Division Experimentation & Lab-Oriented Studies

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

24.833.1 - 24.833.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/20724

Download Count

20

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Paper Authors

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Stephen J. Krause Arizona State University

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Stephen J. Krause is professor in the Materials Program in the Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University. He teaches in the areas of bridging engineering and education, capstone design, and introductory materials science and engineering. His research interests include strategies for web-based teaching and learning, misconceptions and their repair, and role of formative feedback on conceptual change. He has co-developed a Materials Concept Inventory for assessing conceptual knowledge of students in introductory materials engineering classes. He is currently conducting research on web-based tools for teaching and learning, misconceptions and strategies and tools to promote conceptual change in materials courses.

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Dale R. Baker Arizona State University

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Dale Baker is the 2013 awardee of the National Association for Research in ScienceTeaching Distinguished Contributions to Science Education Through Research Award for her work on equity. She is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Educational Research Association. In additon to equity issues in science, her research has focused on engineering education and teacher professional development.

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Adam R. Carberry Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-7060

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Adam R. Carberry, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at Arizona State University in the Fulton Schools of Engineering. He earned a B.S. in Materials Science Engineering from Alfred University, and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both from Tufts University, in Chemistry and Engineering Education respectively. Dr. Carberry was previously an employee of the Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education & Outreach.

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Terry L. Alford Arizona State University

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Casey Jane Ankeny Ph.D. Arizona State University

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Casey Ankeny is a lecturer in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. Her research focuses on the evaluation of student-centered strategies with respect to achievement, attitude, and persistence.

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Milo Koretsky Oregon State University

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Milo Koretsky is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC San Diego and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, all in Chemical Engineering. He currently has research activity in areas related engineering education and is interested in integrating technology into effective educational practices and in promoting the use of higher-level cognitive skills in engineering problem solving. His research interests particularly focus on what prevents students from being able to integrate and extend the knowledge developed in specific courses in the core curriculum to the more complex, authentic problems and projects they face as professionals. Dr. Koretsky is one of the founding members of the Center for Lifelong STEM Education Research at OSU.

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Bill Jay Brooks Oregon State University

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Bill Brooks is a postdoctoral scholar in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. His Ph.D used written explanations to concept questions to investigate technology mediated active learning in the undergraduate chemical engineering classroom. He current interests involve using technology to enhance educational practices in promoting conceptual understanding. He is the primary programmer of the AIChE Concept Warehouse and his current focus is on its continued development, specifically creating and integrating Interactive Virtual Labs.

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Debra M. Gilbuena Oregon State University

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Debra Gilbuena is a postdoctoral scholar in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. Debra has an M.BA, an M.S, and four years of industrial experience including a position in sensor development. Sensor development is also an area in which she holds a patent. She currently has research focused on student learning in virtual laboratories and the diffusion of educational interventions and practices.

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Cindy Waters North Carolina A&T State University

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Cindy K. Waters is an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering at NCA&T State University. She received her B.S. and M.S from Virginia Tech in Materials Science and Engineering Department and a 2004 PhD in Mechanical Engineering, from NCA&T. Her research is in the development and characterization of novel syntactic foams and various porous metals via powder metallurgy and foam casting. She is also significantly involved in engineering education research in the areas of assessment studies of classroom material science pedagogical implementations; case studies in various engineering disciplines and; engineering faculty barriers to adopt evidence-based (or nontraditional) teaching methods . She serves as the College of Engineering liaison to ASEE and advises the Society of Women Engineers student chapter and leads the students in developing and implementing yearly outreach events for the K-8 female community. She is author of many peer-reviewed conference proceeding for the ASEE Annual Meetings and the FIE meetings.

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Brady J. Gibbons Oregon State University

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Dr. Brady Gibbons is an Associate Professor of Materials Science in the School of Mechanical, Industrial, & Manufacturing Engineering at Oregon State University. His research specializes in structure-process-property relationships in multifunctional thin film materials. His group focuses on processing, novel instrumentation development, and integration science; new dielectric, superconducting, semiconducting, and pyroelectric materials for energy conversion and energy storage; ferroelectric and piezoelectric thin films for microelectromechanical systems; scanning probe and x-ray diffraction characterization methods; and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Specifically he is interested in developing novel integration science strategies to combine material functionalities that result in significantly enhanced, or even new, properties. Prior to arriving at OSU he spent eight years at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a postdoctoral researcher and member of the technical staff. There, his research on 2nd generation superconducting wire led to an R&D 100 Award in 2004. He received his Ph. D. in Materials from the Pennsylvania State University in 1998. Dr. Gibbons is a 2012 NSF CAREER awardee, as well. That program is designed to develop new environmentally benign piezoelectric materials, which can be used for a variety of sensing and actuation applications including sonar, ultrasound, energy harvesting, and microelectromechanical systems.

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William Joseph Stuart P.E. Oregon Institute of Technology

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Professor Joe Stuart

PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION

B.Sc., Metallurgical/Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada at Reno (1969) M.Sc., Physical Science, University of Southampton, UK (1972)

APPOINTMENTS

2006 to Present Program Director Manufacturing Engineering Technology, OIT
2011 to Present Associate Professor, MMET Department, Oregon Institute of Technology
2004 to 2011 Assistant Professor, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls
2002 to 2004 National Accounts Manager, Wagner Electronics
1998 to 2002 President/Owner, Best Tech USA
1985 to 1998 VP and General Manager, Alumaweld Boats Inc & Rogue Trailers Inc. 1984 to 1985 Manufacturing Rep MDA Associates
1981 to 1984 Quality Engineer, International Memories Inc.
1980 to 1981 Design Engineer Balteau Standard
1977 to 1980 Field Engineer, Wisar Construction
1975 to 1977 General Manager Milthorn Toleman Ltd., UK
1974 to 1975 Chief Scientist, Puerto Rico Nuclear Center
1972 to 1974 Engineering Consultant, EPA
1969 to 1970 Metallurgical Engineer, Republic Steel Inc.

Professional Societies:

American Society of Engineering Education, Life time member Society of Manufacturing Engineering, American Society of Mechanical Engineers

PUBLICATIONS

(i)Most Closely Related
[1] W.J. Stuart ‘Problem Based Case Learning - Composite Materials Course Development – Examples and classroom reflections’ NEW Conference, Oct 2011
[2] W.J. Stuart and Bedard R. (EPRI) ‘Ocean Renewable Energy Course Evolution and Status’ presented at Energy Ocean Pacific & Oregon Wave Energy Trust Conference, Sept. 2010.
[3] W.J. Stuart, Wave energy 101, presented at Oregon Wave Energy Symposium, Newport, OR, Sept. 2009.
[4] W.J. Stuart, Corrosion considerations when designing with exotic metals and advanced composites, presented at Corrosion Conference of Exotic Metals, Park City, UT, 2009.
[5] W.J. Stuart, Ruth Loring, Ed Webster, Frank Cox, Composite materials course development using problem based case learning techniques, National Educators Workshop, Greensboro, NC, 2009.
[6] W.J. Stuart, Three pronged approach to sustainability at OIT, presented to faculty and staff at OIT 2008 Fall Convocation, 2008.
[7] W.J. Stuart, Sustainability workshop, presented to faculty and staff at OIT 2006 Fall Convocation, 2006.
(ii) Other
[1] W.J. Stuart, Successful programs that have been enriched by industry and engineering education connections, Proceedings of ASEE Conference, Chicago, IL, 2006.

SYNERGISTIC ACTIVITIES

• Course development for Ocean Renewable Energy for Manufacturing Engineering Technology and Renewable Energy Engineering students: developed and taught a new undergraduate dual listed course, Ocean Renewable Energy, in spring 2010. This course has now also been developed and is offered (and has been taught) as a ‘Distance Education’ course.
• Course and lab development for Advanced Composites for Manufacturing Engineering Technology and Mechanical Engineering Technology students: developed and taught a new undergraduate dual listed course, Advanced Composites, in spring 2009 and winter 2010.
• Student advising and course integration in sustainable concepts and life cycle analysis and material selection considerations.
• Innovations in teaching: used innovative teaching methods to enhance the learning experience through introducing problem based case learning techniques in classes and course structure; presentation of paper in National Educators Workshop.

COLLABORATORS AND OTHER AFFILIATIONS

(i) Collaborators and Co-Editors
Frank Cox, Edmonds Community College; Ruth M. Loring, Nashville State Community College; Wangping Sun, Oregon Institute of Technology; Ed Webster, Institute for Professional Training and Education; John Anderson, Oregon Institute of Technology

(ii) Special Material Expert
Curriculum development for National Resource Center-CAM composite materials course for National Resource Center at Edmonds Community College.

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Sean Maass

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Currently pursuing a Masters Degree in Materials Science and Engineering. Passionate about enhancing Engineering Education across the globe as well as continuing to learn more about Materials, Design, Manufacturing, Data Mining and Analysis, and Statistics.

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Candace K. Chan Arizona State University

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Candace K. Chan is an assistant professor in Materials Science and Engineering in the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy at Arizona State University. She teaches introductory materials science to undergraduate engineering majors and is exploring the role of frequent, formative feedback and web-based teaching and learning on student engagement and understanding of materials concepts. Dr. Chan also teaches an advanced course on electrochemical energy conversion and storage and leads a group of undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral researchers focused on the design and characterization of novel materials for batteries and photoelectrochemical applications.

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Abstract

JTF Web-Enabled Faculty and Student Tools for More Effective Teaching and Learning through Frequent Formative FeedbackA major goal of the NSF TUES Type 2 project, Just-in-Time-Teaching with Interactive FrequentFormative Feedback (JiTTIFFF or JTF) is to implement web-enabled tools and resources thatfacilitate strategies, practices, and assessments that use frequent formative feedback to improvestudent attitude, learning, and achievement. Over the last year various web-enabled tools andresources have been developed. One new instructor tool is "pencasts," which can be used fornote-taking, tutoring and "flipped-class" teaching. A smart pen can capture a person's writing onsynchronized with speech and converted into archivable "live" audio PDFs. Another instructorresource is Concept Warehouse (CW), cw.edudiv.org, a web site that has real-time feedback forover 1600 Conceptest questions and Muddiest Point student feedback. PDF output includes aword cloud and end-of-class Muddiest Point student responses. Resources for students include:Muddiest Point YouTube materials science videos at www.youtube.com/user/MaterialsConcepts;Quizlet.com, a vocabulary web-site at http://quizlet.com/MatSciASU that has e-flash cards formaterials terms and definitions, as well as challenging vocabulary games; and SlideShare, a slidesharing web site at http://www.slideshare.net/mseasuslides, where slide sets from materialsscience YouTube Muddiest Point videos are located. Because of ease of implementation and useof the web-enabled resources, application is growing. Nine instructors on the grant are using orare implementing various web-tools in their classrooms and six more are interested at ASU.Also, most of 28 participants of an ASEE 2013 JTF workshop were interested in using anautomated Muddiest Point feedback tool in their classes, especially if an "app" was created for it.Early impact of the JTF project can be assessed from web-resource usage, instructor change, andstudent attitude. To date, the CW Muddiest Point feedback is being used by six instructors andshould grow to more than a dozen during 2014. The YouTube Muddiest Point video site willhave over 100,000 views and 700 subscribers by the end of 2013. Faculty change a year into theproject was assessed with a survey. It showed that 8 or 9 out of 9 faculty agree or strongly agreewith the following. Being involved in the JTF project has: 1) made me a more reflective teacher;2) has motivated me to change my classroom practice; 3) has made my students more engaged asa result of the changes I am implementing in my classroom teaching practice; 4) helped me betterunderstand my students’ learning. The impact of JTF teaching strategies on student attitude wasvery positive at three diverse collaborating institutions. This was shown from results and analysisof a Student Value Survey regarding the usefulness of Muddiest Points to their learning. Thepositive results showed an average of 64% for Interest / Attainment Value, 85% average ofUtility Value, and 84% agreement that the personal cost of effort was low. At ASU, using JTFfor 6 terms has increased student attitude, achievement, and persistence. Overall, impact of theJTF project on participating instructors and students has been quite positive through the firstyear. Another positive indicator of effectiveness of JTF strategies is in dissemination. As a resultof discussions with Wiley Publishing, they will be using three types of JTF teaching and learningresources in their Wiley Plus e-Learning Student Resource in the next edition of two materialstextbooks. They include: 35 Muddiest Point Tutorial and Example Problem videos; a MuddiestPoint data collection tool; and an electronic vocabulary building e-flash card resource. The fullpaper will discuss in more detail, these and other results and developments from the JTF project.

Krause, S. J., & Baker, D. R., & Carberry, A. R., & Alford, T. L., & Ankeny, C. J., & Koretsky, M., & Brooks, B. J., & Gilbuena, D. M., & Waters, C., & Gibbons, B. J., & Stuart, W. J., & Maass, S., & Chan, C. K. (2014, June), JTF Web-Enabled Faculty and Student Tools for More Effective Teaching and Learning Through Two-Way, Frequent Formative Feedback Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/20724

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