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Just-in-Time-Teaching with Interactive Frequent Formative Feedback (JiTTIFFF or JTF) for Cyber Learning in Core Materials Courses

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

23.837.1 - 23.837.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/19851

Download Count

41

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Paper Authors

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Stephen J Krause Arizona State University

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Stephen J. Krause is professor in the Materials Science Program in the Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University. He teaches in the areas of engineering education design, capstone design, and introductory materials engineering. His research interests include evaluating conceptual knowledge, misconceptions and their repair, and conceptual change. He has co-developed a Materials Concept Inventory for assessing conceptual knowledge of students in introductory materials engineering classes. He is currently conducting research on misconceptions and development of strategies and tools to promote conceptual change in materials courses with cyber enabled tools for teaching and learning and assessment of student attitude, achievement, and persistence.

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Dale R Baker Arizona State University

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Dr. Dale Baker is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Educational Research Association. Her research has focused on equity issues in science and engineering, teaching and learning in science and engineering and teacher professional development in science and engineering. A new area of research she is exploring is the issues surrounding increasing the number of individuals with disabilities in science and engineering and the role of adaptive technologies in increasing participation in science and engineering.

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Adam R Carberry Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-7060

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Dr. Adam R. Carberry is an assistant professor at Arizona State University in the College of Technology and Innovation’s Department of Engineering. He earned a B.S. in Materials Science Engineering from Alfred University, and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both from Tufts University, in Chemistry and Engineering Education respectively. Dr. Carberry was previously an employee of the Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education and Outreach and manager of the Student Teacher Outreach Mentorship Program (STOMP).

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Milo Koretsky Oregon State University

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Dr. Milo Koretsky is a professor of Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. He currently has research activity in areas related to thin film materials processing and engineering education. He is interested in integrating technology into effective educational practices and in promoting the use of higher level cognitive skills in engineering problem solving. Dr. Koretsky is a six-time Intel Faculty fellow and has won awards for his work in engineering education at the university and national levels.

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Bill Jay Brooks Oregon State University

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Bill Brooks is a Ph.D candidate in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. As an undergraduate he studied hardware engineering, software engineering, and chemical engineering. Bill has been involved in the development of several educational software tools including the Virtual BioReactor, the Web-based Interactive Science and Engineering (WISE) Learning Tool, and the AIChE Concept Warehouse. His dissertation is focused on technology-mediated, active learning techniques and the mechanisms through which they impact student performance.

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Debra Gilbuena Oregon State University

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Debra Gilbuena is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. She currently has research focused on student learning in virtual laboratories. Debra has an M.BA, an M.S., and four years of industrial experience including a position in sensor development, an area in which she holds a patent. Her dissertation is focused on the characterization and analysis of feedback in engineering education. She also has interests in the diffusion of effective educational interventions and practices.

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Cindy Waters North Carolina A&T State University

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Casey Jane Ankeny Arizona State University

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Dr. Casey J. Ankeny is a post-doctoral fellow in engineering education at Arizona State University and an adjunct professor at Scottsdale Community College. Currently, she is working under Dr. Steven Krause to investigate cyber-based student engagement strategies with frequent, formative feedback in introductory courses. Dr. Ankeny received her bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Virginia in 2006 and her doctorate degree in Biomedical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University in 2012. Here she studied shear and side-dependent microRNAs in human aortic valvular endothelial cells and taught six different biology and engineering courses. Dr. Ankeny aspires to employ student engagement strategies in the context of biomedical engineering education in the future.

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Abstract

Just-in-Time-Teaching with Interactive Frequent Formative Feedback (JiTTIFFF) for Cyber Learning in Core Materials CoursesIn this new NSF-sponsored TUES Type 2 project we are using engagement, assessment, andreflection tools developed in a successful CCLI Phase 1 project and are adapting them to aninteractive cyber-enabled web environment. This is now possible with the recent establishmentof three NSF-supported, web learning and assessment platforms. They include: 1) LectureTools(http://www.lecturetools.com/); 2) Concept Warehouse (http://cw.edudiv.org); 3) ConceptInventory Hub (ciHub) (http://dev.cihub.org/); and also a public site, 4) Materials Conceptswww.youtube.com/user/MaterialsConcepts. LectureTools is a web-based class managementsystem that use a cloud-based JPG slide file with capabilities for student note-taking, studentresponses, and instructor multiple choice clicker questions. The ciHub is a cyber-enabled site forthe use of Concept Inventories for engineering education. The Concept Warehouse is a cyber-enabled site for facilitating conceptual learning in Chemical Engineering with large sets ofconcept-based clicker questions (or ConcepTests) for core chemical engineering classes. Aninstructor has can immediately access results to address student-learning issues by adjustingteaching strategy and instruction. The Materials Concepts URL is a youtube site with shortscreencast tutorials to address students' Muddiest Points, i.e. content that is still unclear fromclass. Using the tools in and out of class has potential to increase effectiveness and efficiency oflearning using frequent formative feedback to students. Innovations from CCLI 1 are reflected ina new project title, Just-in-Time-Teaching with Interactive Frequent Formative Feedback(JiTTIFFF or JTF). The approach is being implemented in four settings with diversepopulations: Arizona State University, North Carolina A&T State University, Oregon Institute ofTechnology, and Oregon State University. The CCLI 1 showed strongly positive studentoutcomes when new strategies and tools were used for instruction informed by a multi-level,assessment-driven frequent formative feedback loops and contextualization of activities andassessments with real-world applications. Compared to lecture-based pedagogy, constructivistpedagogy showed greater conceptual learning gains, improved student attitude, and increasedclass persistence. In this paper we are first reporting on the comparison at diverse institutions ofthe benefits and issues of implementing classroom change using the JTF strategies. Secondly weare also reporting preliminary results focused on the impact of using student Muddiest Point,end-of-class reflective feedback on both instructors and students at the diverse collaborativeinstitutions. Innovative new approaches to providing feedback to students are being employedincluding: Muddiest Point Word Clouds, Muddiest Point YouTube Screencasts, and MuddiestPoint restructured slide sets on Blackboard. Preliminary results indicate very positive reactionsby students for such strategies in supporting their learning. Faculty also are also reportingpositive changes in pedagogy to address student issues in efforts to achieve more effectivelearning. Further details on project strategies, activities and participants, as well as results, willbe presented in the full paper.

Krause, S. J., & Baker, D. R., & Carberry, A. R., & Koretsky, M., & Brooks, B. J., & Gilbuena, D., & Waters, C., & Ankeny, C. J. (2013, June), Just-in-Time-Teaching with Interactive Frequent Formative Feedback (JiTTIFFF or JTF) for Cyber Learning in Core Materials Courses Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/19851

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