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Keeping Error In Class All Semester

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Factors Affecting Student Performance

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

12.996.1 - 12.996.5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1831

Download Count

20

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Paper Authors

author page

David Devine University of Notre Dame - College of Engineering

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Keeping Error in Class All Semester

Abstract

The topic of error in measurements is fundamental to the study of elementary surveying. Textbooks used for such courses often include this topic in the first chapters of the book. Students may not always consider the error involved with measurements, particularly using modern advanced surveying techniques, unless the course is conducted in a manner that develops this premise.

The theme of error in measurements is developed through the entire semester of the course by not only traditional means common in many surveying courses and but also new assignments and activities. The current textbook used in the course covers the subject matter in the second chapter. An active classroom exercise is used to bring the experience of the subject matter into the classroom when covering this chapter. Laboratory exercises for the course still utilize the steel tape. Thus, error corrections for temperature can be used to reinforce the concept of error. An Internet investigation assignment is used to get students to search beyond the class textbook and reinforce the types of error that occur with EDM and GPS equipment. Level survey work both in the classroom and laboratory always involve “closing the circuit”. Finally, near the end of the course, latitudes and departures exercises are used to bring distance measurement together with directions and subsequent computation and balancing the latitudes and departures by the compass rule.

The reinforcement of error in measurements permits this theme to stay with the subject matter of the course all semester long. The knowledge of error in surveying measurements can be an aspect of meeting a TAC-ABET program objective of quality. Students who take subsequent courses in surveying will certainly study error in measurements in more detail. However, students who only take the elementary surveying class will have the theme emphasized repeatedly during the semester and thus they also will recognize that error occurs in all measurements and be able to interpret data with this knowledge.

Background

The topic of error in measurements is fundamental to the study of elementary surveying. Textbooks used for such courses often include this topic in the first chapters of the book. The topic of error in measurements concerns all measurements performed in surveying. However, students may not always consider the error involved with measurements, particularly using modern advanced surveying techniques, unless the course is conducted in a manner that develops this premise. Since modern advanced surveying techniques are becoming more common, the knowledge that error exists with values obtained using this type of surveying is more relevant.

Error in measurements has been developed as a theme to an elementary surveying class in the civil engineering technology program at Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne. Not all civil engineering technology students will work in the surveying field and in fact few of them

Devine, D. (2007, June), Keeping Error In Class All Semester Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/1831

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