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Learning Assistive Device Design Through the Creation of 3D Printed Children's Prosthetics with Augmented Grip Diversity

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Conference

2018 ASEE Zone IV Conference

Location

Boulder, Colorado

Publication Date

March 25, 2018

Start Date

March 25, 2018

End Date

March 27, 2018

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29621

Download Count

65

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Paper Authors

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Ryan Carroll Canada College

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Brian Carrozza Canada College

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Brian Carrozza is currently a sophomore at Cañada College in Redwood City, CA, majoring in Mechanical Engineering. He believes in improving the world with better design. His research interests include AI CAD for 3D drafting and super-insulated passive homes. He will pursue a career in research and design engineering where he will utilize his creativity to innovate and problem solve.

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Yardley Ordonez Canada College

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Yardley Ordonez is currently a sophomore at Canada College working on transferring to a four year university. His plan is to become a Robotics Engineer and have his own consulting business in the future.

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Edgar Sanchez Canada College

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Andres Lee San Francisco State University

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Recipient of a Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering with an emphasis in Robotics and Control Systems from San Francisco State University.

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Amelito G Enriquez Canada College Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1259-0680

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Amelito Enriquez is a professor of Engineering and Mathematics at Cañada College in Redwood City, CA. He received a BS in Geodetic Engineering from the University of the Philippines, his MS in Geodetic Science from the Ohio State University, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include technology-enhanced instruction and increasing the representation of female, minority and other underrepresented groups in mathematics, science and engineering.

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Wenshen Pong P.E. San Francisco State University

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Wenshen Pong received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He joined the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University in 1998. He teaches courses in Civil/Structural Engineering.

Dr. Pong is a registered Professional Engineer in California. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Structural Engineers Association of California. He has published over fifty technical papers in the areas of Structural Control and Earthquake Engineering. Dr. Pong has been the Director of the School of Engineering at SFSU with 20 full-time faculty and over 25 part-time faculty since 2009.

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Xiaorong Zhang San Francisco State University

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Xiaorong Zhang received the B.S. degree in computer science from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, in 2006, the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in computer engineering from University of Rhode Island, Kingston, in 2009 and 2013 respectively. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. Her research interests include embedded systems, wearable technologies, neural-machine interface, and cyber-physical systems.

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Hamid Mahmoodi San Francisco State University

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Hamid Mahmoodi received his Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 2005. He is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include low-power, reliable, and high-performance circuit design in nano-electronic technologies. He has published more than one hundred technical papers in journals and conferences and holds five U.S. patents. He was a co-recipient of the 2008 SRC Inventor Recognition Award, the 2006 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society VLSI Transactions Best Paper Award, 2005 SRC Technical Excellence Award, and the Best Paper Award of the 2004 International Conference on Computer Design. He has served on technical program committees of Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, International Symposium on Low Power Electronics Design, and International Symposium on Quality Electronics Design.

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Zhaoshuo Jiang P.E. San Francisco State University

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Zhaoshuo Jiang graduated from the University of Connecticut with a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering. Before joining San Francisco State University as an assistant professor, he worked as a structural engineering professional at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) LLP. As a licensed professional engineer in the states of Connecticut and California, Dr. Jiang has been involved in the design of a variety of low-rise and high-rise projects. His current research interests mainly focus on Smart Structures Technology, Structural Control and Health Monitoring and Innovative Engineering Education.

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Cheng Chen San Francisco State University

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Dr. Cheng Chen is currently an associate professor in the school of engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include earthquake engineering, structural reliability and fire structural engineering.

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Hao Jiang San Francisco State University

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Hao Jiang received the B.S. degree in materials sciences from Tsinghua University, China, in 1994 and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of California, San Diego, in 2000.

Hao Jiang has been with San Francisco State University since August 2007 as an assistant professor in electrical engineering. Prior joining SFSU, he worked for Broadcom Corporation, Jazz Semiconductor and Conexant Systems Inc. His research interests are in the general area of analog integrated circuits, particularly in ultra-low-power circuits for biomedical applications.

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Kwok Siong Teh San Francisco State University

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Kwok Siong Teh received his B.S., M.S., Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and University of California at Berkeley in 1997, 2001, and 2004, respectively. He is currently a professor of mechanical engineering and the Associate Director of the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. His primary research interests are in: (i) the synthesis, characterization, and applications of metal oxides, conductive polymer, and low dimensional carbon nanostructures for energy generation and storage; (ii) engineering design pedagogy that incorporates makerspace, case studies, and scenario-based learning.

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Abstract

Human-centered design (HCD) is a design methodology that enables designers to intimately integrate the needs of the users into the design solutions via an iterative process of Observation, Ideation, Rapid Prototyping, User Feedback, and Implementation. In this work, we document the 10-week summer research internship of a team of 5 community college mechanical engineering students, led by two mechanical engineering senior student mentors and a mechanical engineering faculty at a 4-year college, in using the principle of HCD to solve a real-world problem. The project began with the significant problem of children suffering from congenital upper body limb deficiency or partial hand loss due to traumatic amputation. It is estimated that about 1,500 babies are born each year in the United States with upper limb reduction defects, which may create significant functional limitations for the child. The research conducted for this paper focuses primarily on devices which have been fabricated for children with partial hand defects or amputations, specifically for those children whose wrists are still fully functional. Technologically advanced and commercially available myoelectric prosthetics are expensive, costing upwards of four thousand dollars. The issue of cost is exacerbated by the fact that children can outgrow their prostheses relatively quickly, requiring the fitting of new prostheses on an annual basis. In addition, due to the utilization of advanced electronics in commercial myoelectric prostheses, durability for use by children is a concern. Alternatively, purely mechanical and body-actuated prosthetics are also available but only perform basic single-grip functionality. With these two categories of prosthetics, users are forced to choose between high cost and limited functionality. This research seeks to bridge that gap by providing a low-cost, 3D printable prosthetic hand with improved functionality. In order to enhance prosthetic functionality, increasing grip diversity was a primary focus. This was done by adding a mechanism which enables the ability to control fingers individually, thus allowing the user to handle smaller items with a more precise, two or three-finger grip. A grip lock has also been implemented in order to reduce fatigue during extended use. Multiple tests were devised in order to test the effectiveness of the design modifications made, with results showing marked improvements over a standard prosthetic in certain use cases. Our goal with these modifications is to increase the number of children with upper limb loss to be able to use 3D printed prosthetics and pass a series of tests to show the improvements. Based on post-internship interviews of the research students, noticeable and meaningful learnings and professional growth were reported. In particular, the summer research experience deepened the students’ understanding of and readiness for demanding research, and kindled and/or reinforced the students’ motivation to pursue a master’s degree in a STEM field. Through working closely with student mentors and faculty, they gained valuable insights into how scientific workers work on real problems and the elements of the research process. Overall, the summer research internship has been an extraordinarily fulfilling and remarkable professional growth experience for all involved.

Carroll, R., & Carrozza, B., & Ordonez, Y., & Sanchez, E., & Lee, A., & Enriquez, A. G., & Pong, W., & Zhang, X., & Mahmoodi, H., & Jiang, Z., & Chen, C., & Jiang, H., & Teh, K. S. (2018, March), Learning Assistive Device Design Through the Creation of 3D Printed Children's Prosthetics with Augmented Grip Diversity Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Zone IV Conference, Boulder, Colorado. https://peer.asee.org/29621

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