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Lessons From Starting An Entrepreneurship Program

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Successful Entrepreneurship Programs

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

8.819.1 - 8.819.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12629

Download Count

10

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Paper Authors

author page

John Wierman

author page

Marybeth Camerer

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 0897

Lessons from Starting an Entrepreneurship Program

John C. Wierman, Marybeth Camerer The Johns Hopkins University

1. Introduction

The W. P. Carey Program in Entrepreneurship & Management is housed in the Mathematical Sciences Department of the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. It concentrates on preparing undergraduates to become founders and leaders of major enterprises later in their careers. The academic program provides basic business education courses in accounting, finance, ethics, and marketing, plus advanced courses in entrepreneurship, information technology management, intellectual property protection, organizational development, negotiation and conflict management, internet law, and internet marketing. Experiential learning opportunities include internships for credit, a business plan competition, a student-managed investment portfolio, a student business society, a Wall Street trip (including resume critiques and mock interviews), and an intersession course with alumni entrepreneur speakers. Currently in its sixth year, the program has had many successes and encountered substantial obstacles and setbacks. This article describes the difficulties of starting an entrepreneurship program in a mathematics department at a university which does not have a business school, and discusses lessons learned which may be helpful to others who are developing entrepreneurship programs.

2. A Brief Description of the Entrepreneurship & Management Program

Johns Hopkins University is a leading research university, located primarily in Baltimore, Maryland, with satellite campuses throughout the Baltimore – Washington DC area, as well as in Italy, Germany, Singapore, and China. Students at Hopkins are extremely bright, creative, and ambitious. The undergraduate student enrollment is approximately 4000, from nearly all states and many foreign nations. The admissions process is very selective, and the admitted students have combined Verbal and Quantitative SAT scores averaging well over 1400. Approximately two-thirds of these students major in the School of Arts and Sciences, and the other one-third major in Engineering. The largest undergraduate majors are Biomedical Engineering, Biology, Computer Science, Economics, and International Relations.

The W. P. Carey Program in Entrepreneurship and Management, founded and directed by Prof. John C. Wierman, operates within the Mathematical Sciences Department of the Whiting School of Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. It provides a variety of academic and experiential learning opportunities to prepare undergraduate students in both the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering for careers as founders, leaders, and managers of Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Wierman, J., & Camerer, M. (2003, June), Lessons From Starting An Entrepreneurship Program Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12629

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