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Lessons Learned from Evaluating Three Virtual Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) Programs Using Common Instruments and Protocols (Evaluation)

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Pre-College Engineering Education Division Technical Session 5

Tagged Division

Pre-College Engineering Education

Page Count

18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37438

Download Count

33

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Paper Authors

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Jean S. Larson Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4898-2149

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Jean Larson, Ph.D., is the Educational Director for the NSF-funded Engineering Research Center for Bio-mediated and Bio-inspired Geotechnics (CBBG), and Assistant Research Professor in both the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment and the Division of Educational Leadership and Innovation at Arizona State University. She has a Ph.D. in Educational Technology, postgraduate training in Computer Systems Engineering, and many years of experience teaching and developing curriculum in various learning environments. She has taught technology integration and teacher training to undergraduate and graduate students at Arizona State University, students at the K-12 level locally and abroad, and various workshops and modules in business and industry. Dr. Larson is experienced in the application of instructional design, delivery, evaluation, and specializes in eLearning technologies for training and development. Her research focuses on the efficient and effective transfer of knowledge and learning techniques, innovative and interdisciplinary collaboration, and strengthening the bridge between K-12 learning and higher education in terms of engineering content.

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Megan O'Donnell Arizona State University

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Megan O’Donnell is a Research Professional in the College Research and Evaluation Services Team (CREST). Dr. O’Donnell received her Ph.D. from Arizona State University, where she focused on risk and resiliency processes in Mexican American adolescents. Her current research and evaluation interests include evaluation methodology, mixed methods design, evaluation of engineering and STEAM education programs. Currently, she works on evaluation efforts for the US Department of Education, National Science Foundation, local foundations, and state grants.

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Kristi Lynn Eustice Arizona State University

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Carolyn Aitken Nichol Rice University

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Dr. Carolyn Nichol is a Faculty Fellow in Chemistry and the Director of the Rice Office of STEM Engagement (R-STEM). R-STEM provides teacher professional development to elementary and secondary teachers in science and math content and pedagogy, while also providing STEM outreach to the Houston Community. Dr. Nichol’s research interests are in science education and science policy. She received her B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, her doctorate in chemical engineering from the University of Texas (UT) at Austin, and served as a postdoctoral fellow in the College of Pharmacy at UT Austin. Prior to joining Rice University, she worked at Boehringer Ingelheim on innovative drug delivery systems and she was an Assistant Professor in Diagnostic Radiology at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, where she conducted research on nonviral gene therapy systems. At Rice University she has developed and taught courses in The Department of Bioengineering including Numerical Methods, Pharmaceutical Engineering, Systems Physiology, Biomaterials and Advances in BioNanotechnology.

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Kristen Jaskie Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3258-2063

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Kristen Jaskie is a Ph.D. student in Electrical Engineering in the ECEE school at ASU and she is a research associate with SenSIP. She received her B.S in Computer Science from the University of Washington and her M.S. in Computer Science specializing in AI and Machine Learning (ML) at the University of California San Diego. Kristen’s main areas of interest are in ML algorithm development and ML education. Specific interests include semi-supervised learning and the positive unlabeled learning problem. In addition, Kristen owns her own consulting company and was a faculty member and department chair in Computer Science at Glendale Community College in Glendale, AZ for several years before returning to school to complete her Ph.D. She is expecting to graduate in Spring 2021.

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Andreas S. Spanias Arizona State University

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Andreas Spanias is Professor in the School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU). He is also the director of the Sensor Signal and Information Processing (SenSIP) center and the founder of the SenSIP industry consortium (also an NSF I/UCRC site). His research interests are in the areas of adaptive signal processing, speech processing, machine learning and sensor systems. He and his student team developed the computer simulation software Java-DSP and its award-winning iPhone/iPad and Android versions. He is author of two textbooks: Audio Processing and Coding by Wiley and DSP; An Interactive Approach (2nd Ed.). He contributed to more than 300 papers, 10 monographs 11 full patents, and 10 provisional patents. He served as Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing and as General Co-chair of IEEE ICASSP-99. He also served as the IEEE Signal Processing Vice-President for Conferences. Andreas Spanias is co-recipient of the 2002 IEEE Donald G. Fink paper prize award and was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 2003. He served as Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Signal processing society in 2004. He is a series editor for the Morgan and Claypool lecture series on algorithms and software. He received recently the 2018 IEEE Phoenix Chapter award with citation: “For significant innovations and patents in signal processing for sensor systems.” He also received the 2018 IEEE Region 6 Educator Award (across 12 states) with citation: “For outstanding research and education contributions in signal processing.” He was elected recently as Senior Member of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

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Kimberly Farnsworth Indiana University-Bloomington Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4132-0281

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Kimberly Farnsworth is Educational Technologist at the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA). Previously, Kimberly served as Education Coordinator at the Center for Bio-mediated and Bio-inspired Geotechnics (CBBG) a National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center (ERC). She is currently a doctoral candidate in Instructional Systems Technology at Indiana University and has a M.Ed. from Arizona State University. Kimberly has over 25 years of experience in the fields of education and technology. Her research focus is on authentic learning environments in the sciences.

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Jennifer M. Blain Christen Arizona State University

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Jennifer Blain Christen received a bachelor's degree (1999), master's degree (2001) and doctorate (2006) in electrical and computer engineering from Johns Hopkins University. Her dissertation focused on bioelectronics and microfluidics for life science applications exemplified through the development of a micro-incubator for cell culture. Blain Christen held a Graduate Research Fellowship and a G K-12 fellowship both from the National Science Foundation. In her postdoctoral work at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the Immunogentics Department, she developed a microfluidic platform for homogeneous HLA (human leukocyte antigen) allele detection. Her research interests involve design of analog and mixed-mode integrated electronics for direct interface via innovative fabrication techniques to aqueous environments with special emphasis on biological materials.

Blain Christen is currently leading the BioElectrical Systems and Technology group at Arizona State University. The group has recently focused on flexible neural interfaces and point-of-care molecular diagnostics for underserved populations. She is primarily funded by the NSF, NIH, and CDMPR. Her research also has significant funding related to her startup, FlexBioTech.

Blain Christen serves on the Board of Governors for the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society, and she is president of the Biomedical Circuits and Systems Technical Committee. She also serves on the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative Taskforce at ASU.

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Mi Yeon Lee Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3937-8695

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Dr. Lee is an assistant professor of mathematics education in the division of teacher preparation in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. She teaches undergraduate mathematics content courses and mathematics methods courses for pre-service teachers. Her scholarship, teaching, and service bridge mathematics education and teacher education to illuminate how teachers’ knowledge and their ability to notice, interpret, and use students’ mathematical reasoning in their teaching can promote students’ meaningful mathematical learning. Dr. Lee has been served as the managing editor for the journal, Research in Mathematical Education and as the editorial panel for the mathematics part of the journal, Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education.

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Abstract

Due to the COVID-19 crisis preventing face-to-face interaction, three National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded centers employed a virtual/remote format for their summer Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) Programs, reaching K-12 STEM teachers across the country. Teachers participated virtually from four different states by joining engineering research teams from four different universities in three different RET programs. Lab experiences depended on the nature of the research and institution-specific guidelines for in-lab efforts, resulting in some teachers conducting lab experiments with materials sent directly to their homes, some completing their experience fully online, and some completing portions of lab work in person on campus. Each teacher developed an engineering lesson plan based on the corresponding center’s research to be implemented either in person or virtually during the 2020-2021 academic school year. Research posters, created with support from graduate student and faculty mentors, were presented to industry partners, education partners, center members, and the NSF. Support for the teachers as they implement lessons, present posters, and disseminate their developed curricula, has continued throughout the year. Common survey and interview/focus group protocols, previously designed specifically for measuring the impact of engineering education programs, were adapted and used to separately evaluate each of the three virtual programs. Strengths and suggested areas of improvement will be explored and discussed to inform future use of the common evaluation instruments. Additionally, preliminary results, highlighting general successes and challenges of shifting RET programming to a virtual/remote format across the three centers, will be discussed.

Larson, J. S., & O'Donnell, M., & Eustice, K. L., & Nichol, C. A., & Jaskie, K., & Spanias, A. S., & Farnsworth, K., & Blain Christen, J. M., & Lee, M. Y. (2021, July), Lessons Learned from Evaluating Three Virtual Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) Programs Using Common Instruments and Protocols (Evaluation) Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37438

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