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Lessons Learned In A Successful Underrepresented Minority Retention Program

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Retention Issues

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

10.893.1 - 10.893.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14856

Download Count

62

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Paper Authors

author page

Dana Newell

author page

Mary Anderson-Rowland

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2270

LESSONS LEARNED IN A SUCCESSFUL UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITY RETENTION PROGRAM

Mary R. Anderson-Rowland Dana C. Newell

Arizona State University

Abstract

In the fall of 2003, a National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) Academic Scholarship Program was begun with 21 underrepresented students in the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University. The students were supported by a scholarship for the academic year and attended a two credit hour Academic Success Workshop in the fall and met for one hour every other week in the spring semester. Due to scheduling problems, the students met in two groups during the spring. The Academic Success Workshop has been described in a previous paper.

The primary goals of the NACME Program are to give assistance and support to retain the students in good stead. The program purposes are to help with the adjustment to being a university freshman and a minority student, to ensure that students know where to turn for assistance when needed, to assist in forming a student support network, to help the students work in a team, to sharpen presentation skills, and to make the program experience enjoyable.

This paper will include a discussion of the spring semester program, an overall evaluation of the first year of the program, and the retention problems encountered with the first group of students. In addition, we will discuss the diversity issues overcome with the selection of the second NACME class for fall 2004, as well as the lessons learned in year one and the student feedback through ongoing evaluation that caused changes in the second year of the program.

Keywords: Academic Success Workshop, Freshmen Retention, NACME Program, Scholarship Program, Underrepresented Minorities

I. Introduction

In the fall of 2003, the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) Academic Scholarship Program was begun in the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University with 21 freshmen underrepresented students in engineering or computer science. The students all had a high school GPA of 3.0 or better, had financial need, were U.S. citizens or permanent residents, had completed an application and an essay, and had submitted two letters of recommendation, at least one from an academic instructor. The students were supported by a scholarship up to $2,500, depending on financial need, for the academic year. The funding for the scholarships came from the $25K grant block award from NACME was supplemented by

Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education

Newell, D., & Anderson-Rowland, M. (2005, June), Lessons Learned In A Successful Underrepresented Minority Retention Program Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/14856

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