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Lessons Learned: Reflections On A Department’s First Tc2 K Evaluation

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

TC2K Methods and Models

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

11.888.1 - 11.888.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1145

Download Count

26

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Paper Authors

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Gregory Neff Purdue University-Calumet

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Greg is Professor of Mechanical Engineering Technology at Purdue University Calumet. He has graduate degrees in mechanical engineering, physics, and mathematics. He is a Registered Professional Engineer, a Certified Manufacturing Engineer, and a Certified Manufacturing Technologist. He served as a TAC/ABET MET program accreditation visitor from 1996 to 2003, as secretary, program chair, chair and past chair of the MET Department Heads Committee of ASME. He was first elected to the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET in 2003 and is currently an alternate member. He won the ASEE Meryl K. Miller Award in 1994.

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Susan Scachitti Purdue University-Calumet

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Susan is Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering Technology at Purdue University Calumet. She holds degrees in Industrial Engineering Technology from the University of Dayton and a MBA in Management from North Central College. She teaches TQM and consults in the area of continuous improvement. Sue is past chair of the IE Division of ASEE and formerly served as division chair, program chair, newsletter editor, and treasurer. She has served as a TAC/ABET commissioner since 2003 and program accreditation evaluator since 2001. This year she is a TAC alternate commissioner representing IIE.

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Lash Mapa Purdue University-Calumet

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Lash is an Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering Technology. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Manchester, England. His industrial experience includes twelve years as a Chemical Engineer and management positions in manufacturing engineering, engineering services, and process and quality control for Unilever, British Petroleum, Hawker Siddley, and Allied-Signal Corporation. His interests focus on heat transfer, nano-fluids, six sigma, HVAC, continuous improvement, and technology outreach. He is a senior member of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and a certified Manufacturing Engineer.

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James Higley Purdue University-Calumet

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Jim holds the rank of Professor of Mechanical Engineering Technology at Purdue University Calumet. He is a registered P.E. in Indiana. He is responsible for coordinating the Mechanical Engineering Technology program, as well as teaching courses in parametric modeling; integrated design, analysis & manufacturing; manufacturing processes; and thermodynamics. He holds Bachelor and Masters Degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University.

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Mohammad Zahraee Purdue University-Calumet

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Mohammad is Professor and Head of the Department of Manufacturing Engineering Technologies and Supervision at Purdue University Calumet. He received his Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from the University of Illinois. He is a registered P.E. in Indiana. He is the recipient of ASME's Distinguished Service Award and the Ben Sparks Metal. He has been a TAC (Technology Accreditation Committee) evaluator for ABET since 1992. When he was chair of the Committee on Technology Accreditation of ASME, he was also chair of the committee that drafted the current MET program criteria. Mohammad is on the executive committee of TAC and has served the commission since 1997.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Lessons Learned: Reflections on a Department’s First TC2K Evaluation

Abstract

The department’s first accreditation visit under the TC2K criteria was completed in fall, 2005. The philosophy of continuous improvement requires an assessment of the results -- an “after action report” so to speak to assess how the department’s presentation was received by the visiting team, how well the preparation accomplished what was necessary, and what could be improved next time. This paper is a follow up to our analysis on the implementation of TC2K and our department’s preparations over the past six years1-9 . In particular we show how it was demonstrated that students met the department program outcomes and the Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) “a through k” program outcomes before graduation. Concrete examples will be provided that may be useful for other programs nearing an ABET visit.

Introduction

The department has six full- time engineering technology faculty members serving the mechanical engineering technology (MET) and industrial engineering technology (IET) programs. All were fully engaged over the last several years preparing for the visit. There were no slackers in the department. Administrative leadership was largely responsible by fostering a continuous quality improvement atmosphere and communication within the department 8,9. Departmental faculty members from two non-ABET accredited programs in the department and non- faculty staff members also helped out significantly. Also responsible was the value the university places on continuous improvement and accreditation. For example, both IET faculty members teach and cons ult in the area of total quality ma nagement and three of the six engineering technology faculty in the department are TAC/ABET commissioners or alternates with accreditation team chair experience. Insights from these individuals will be presented in the paper.

Associate Degree

One insight realized during the visit preparation was that the department’s associate degree level engineering technology programs would have more difficulty meeting the requirements of the TC2K criteria than the four year programs. The criteria require demonstrating that graduates meet the same “a through k” outcomes whether they have experienced four years of course work or only two. It was difficult or impossible to add new courses to cover any of the so-called “soft” ABET program outcomes “h, i, j, and k” that were not covered before TC2K. Simultaneously, Purdue University Calumet added a new general education graduation requirement requiring all programs teach a one to three credit hour freshman experience course to improve retention, an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) goal and project for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. In response, the department modified the title and contents of an existing three credit freshman level computer course. Our sister MET program at Purdue West Lafayette found that most students were getting adequate preparation using computer software such as Microsoft Office in

Neff, G., & Scachitti, S., & Mapa, L., & Higley, J., & Zahraee, M. (2006, June), Lessons Learned: Reflections On A Department’s First Tc2 K Evaluation Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/1145

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