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Levels of Social Network Analysis and Small Team Problem-solving in the Classroom

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Examining Social Ties and Networks

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

26.1090.1 - 26.1090.17

DOI

10.18260/p.24427

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24427

Download Count

137

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Paper Authors

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Peter A Simon Carnegie Mellon University

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B.S. Civil Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 1990; M.S.Civil Engineering,Texas A&M, 2000;
PhD, Civil Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 2014.

Formerly commercial (oilfield) diver in the Persian Gulf and South China Sea.

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Susan Finger Carnegie Mellon University

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Susan Finger is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. She is also affiliated with the School of Architecture and the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems. Dr. Finger received her B.A. in Astronomy and M.A. in Operations Research from the University of Pennsylvania and her Ph.D. in Electric Power Systems through Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was the first program director for Design Theory and Methodology at the National Science Foundation. She is a founder and Co-Editor-in-Chief of the journal Research in Engineering Design. Dr. Finger's research interests include collaborative learning in design, rapid prototyping, and integration of design and manufacturing concerns. She is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

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David Krackhardt Carnegie Mellon University

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David M. Krackhardt is Professor of Organizations at the Heinz College of Public Policy and a Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University. He received a BS degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on how theoretical insights and methodological innovations of network analysis enhance our understanding of how organizations function. He pioneered the concept of cognitive social structures, wherein individuals provide their perceptions of the network in which they are embedded. Empirically, he has related these perceived structures to organizational culture, turnover, reputations and power in organizations.

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Daniel P. Siewiorek Carnegie Mellon University

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Professor Daniel P. Siewiorek is the Buhl University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He has designed or been involved with the design of nine multiprocessor systems and has been a key contributor to the dependability design of over two dozen commercial computing systems. Dr. Siewiorek leads an interdisciplinary team that has designed and constructed over 20 generations of mobile computing systems. He has written nine textbooks in addition to over 475 papers. He is Director of the Quality of Life Technology NSF Engineering Research Center and previously served as Department Head of the Human Computer Interaction Institute. He has been the recipient of the AAEE Terman Award, the IEEE/ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award, and the ACM SIGMOBILE Outstanding Contributions Award. He is a Fellow of IEEE, ACM, and AAAS and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

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Asim Smailagic Carnegie Mellon University

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Professor Asim Smailagic is a Research Professor in the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at CMU. He is also the Leader of Research Thrust on Virtual Coaches at the Quality of Life Technology Center, an NSF ERC, and Director of the Laboratory for Interactive Computer Systems and Wearable Computers at CMU. This Lab has developed over 30 novel mobile computer systems over the last twenty years. Dr. Smailagic has led or participated in numerous NSF, NIH, DARPA, and other research projects. Dr. Smailagic is a Fellow of IEEE and recipient of the Allen Newell Award for Research Excellence from Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science. Dr. Smailagic has been a Program Chairman of over ten IEEE conferences. He was the Chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Wearable Information Systems and has had editorship roles in leading archival technical journals, such as IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, IEEE Transactions on Computers, IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Computing. He has written or edited books in the areas of mobile and wearable computing, digital system design, field programmable gate arrays, and VLSI systems. Dr. Smailagic received the Fulbright post-doctoral award at Carnegie Mellon in Computer Science in 1988.

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Abstract

Levels of Social Network Analysis and Small Group Problem Solving in the Classroom In a collaborative learning environment, transfer of knowledge is highly dependent onsociocultural factors including the interaction between the learners as well as the interactionswith the instructor. An understanding of some of the factors that go into the dynamics oflearners and learning can be gleaned through the use of social network analysis (SNA). Even asingle time-slice of the social network of a class, which shows the social ties between thestudents, can reveal much about a student’s position in the network, which may affect what andhow a student learns and his/her problem solving ability. This paper presents a study of the levels of the social network of students in anengineering project course. The analysis is done in the context of a problem-solving (design) taskgiven to small teams of students. The “quality” of the final design is evaluated using a rubricthat yields a quantifiable result. In addition to an analysis of the social network, two measures ofemotional intelligence were assessed for each student. We relate the team members’ positions intheir networks and the assessment of their emotional intelligence to the problem solving abilityof the team. The outcome of the study is discussed, primarily with respect to the discoveries of howproblem-solving ability is related to the levels of SNA. The opportunities for future work in theareas of the roles of social network analysis and emotional intelligence can play in the analysis oflearning are also presented.

Simon, P. A., & Finger, S., & Krackhardt, D., & Siewiorek, D. P., & Smailagic, A. (2015, June), Levels of Social Network Analysis and Small Team Problem-solving in the Classroom Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24427

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015