Asee peer logo

Leveraging S-STEM Scholarship Programs

Download Paper |

Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

25.899.1 - 25.899.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/21656

Download Count

34

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Mary R. Anderson-Rowland Arizona State University

visit author page

Mary Anderson-Rowland is the PI of an NSF STEP grant to work with five
non-metropolitan community colleges to produce more engineers, especially female and underrepresented minority engineers. She also directs two academic scholarship programs, including one for transfer students. An Associate Professor in computing, informatics, and systems design engineering, she was the Associate Dean of Student Affairs in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at ASU from 1993-2004. Anderson-Rowland was named a top 5% teacher in the Fulton Schools of Engineering for 2009-10. She received the WEPAN Engineering Educator Award 2009, ASEE Minorities Award 2006, the SHPE Educator of the Year 2005, and the National Engineering Award in 2003, the highest honor given by AAES. In 2002, she was named the Distinguished Engineering Educator by the Society of Women Engineers. She has more than 175 publications, primarily in the areas of recruitment and retention of women and underrepresented minority engineering and computer science students. Her awards are based on her mentoring of students, especially transfer, women, and underrepresented minority students, and her research in the areas of recruitment and retention. A SWE and ASEE Fellow, she is a frequent speaker on enhancing the transfer experience, career opportunities, and diversity in engineering.

visit author page

biography

Armando A. Rodriguez Arizona State University

visit author page

Prior to joining the ASU faculty in 1990, Armando A. Rodriguez worked at MIT, IBM, AT&T Bell Laboratories, and Raytheon Missile Systems. He has also consulted for Eglin Air Force Base, Boeing Defense and Space Systems, Honeywell, and NASA. He has published more than 200 technical papers in refereed journals and conference proceedings. He has authored three engineering texts. Rodriguez has given more than 70 invited presentations--13 plenary--at international and national forums, conferences and corporations. Since 1994, he has directed an extensive engineering mentoring-research program that has served more than 300 students. Rodriguez's research interests include control of nonlinear distributed parameter and sampled-data systems; modeling, simulation, animation, and real-time control (MoSART) of Flexible Autonomous Machines operating in an uncertain Environment (FAME); control of bio-economic systems, renewable resources, and sustainable development; and control of semiconductor, (hypersonic) aerospace, robotic, and low power electronic systems. Rodriguez has received the following honors: AT&T Bell Laboratories Fellowship; Boeing A.D. Welliver Fellowship; ASU Engineering Teaching Excellence Award; IEEE International Outstanding Advisor Award; White House Presidential Excellence Award for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring; and the Ralf Yorque Memorial Best Paper Prize. Rodriguez has also served on various national technical committees and panels. He is currently serving on the following National Academies panels: Survivability and Lethality Analysis, and Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Autonomous Systems. Personal website: http://aar.faculty.asu.edu/.

visit author page

biography

Richard A. Hall Jr. Cochise Community College

visit author page

Richard (Bubba) Hall is the Dean of Math, Science, and Health Science at Cochise College and PI of the NSF Cochise Community College METSTEP program. He is working closely with Arizona State University’s METS program and Office of Academic Partnerships to build transfer pathways for Cochise College engineering students to Arizona State. Under his supervision, Cochise College has developed an associate of science degree and associate of applied science degree in engineering, as well as introductory and programming courses for engineering. Hall also plays an important support role in the Running Start program, a college program that gives local high school students an opportunity to pursue an engineering degree at the beginning of their junior year. Most importantly, a team of math, science, and engineering instructors has been formed to help lead all engineering efforts. JoAnn Deakin, Feng Yang, Mark Gibson, and Kristy Ritter have all played important roles in the development of the engineering program at Cochise College.

visit author page

biography

Phil Blake McBride Eastern Arizona College

visit author page

Phil McBride received a B.S. from the University of Arizona in 1986, a M.A.T. in 1989 from Northern Arizona University, and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Miami University in 2003. He taught high school in Northern Arizona for five years before moving to Eastern Arizona College in 1991 to teach chemistry. He was recognized by the EAC Student Association as the most admired faculty in 1993, received the Alumni Faculty Recognition Award in 1996, the Distinguished Service Award in 1997, and in 2008 received the Rocky Mountain Region College Educator Award for Excellence in Teaching by the American Chemical Society. For the past five years, he has served as Dean of Instruction, while continuing to teach at least one course each semester. Dr. Jack Bailey has played an important role in the development of the engineering program at Eastern Arizona Community College.

visit author page

biography

Rakesh Pangasa Arizona Western College

visit author page

Rakesh Pangasa is the PI of the Arizona Western College METSTEP program. After practicing as a scientist, researcher, and industrial R&D manager for 14 years at the Cement Research Institute of India serving cement, concrete, and construction industries, he immigrated to U.S. in 1986 and switched to teaching, training, and consulting. Since then, he
has been engaged in teaching mathematics, computer programming, engineering, and objectivism at Arizona Western College and has taught at all the three state universities in Arizona. He has also taught undergraduate and graduate students
in business administration, information systems, operations management, and strategic management for Northern Arizona University and for Webster University at their campuses in Yuma, Denver, Vienna, and
Shanghai. He has also worked as Commissioning Engineer for FLSmidth, training operators at a few plants
of American Electric Power, and as Senior Computer Systems Analyst for Yuma proving grounds on future combat systems software interoperability. In his efforts towards motivating high school students
to explore engineering, he has launched the first Yuma community robotic team for regional competition.
His research interests and passion include building strong relations amongst academics, research, and
industry. He earned his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Panjab University in 1971 and a Ph.D. in industrial engineering from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi in 1986.

visit author page

biography

John M. Saber Mohave Community College

visit author page

John M. Saber is the PI of the Mohave Community College METSTEP program. He worked as a Russian translator in Berlin during the 1970s. He returned to the U.S. in 1976, and after a few years working in counter intelligence, he began work on his Ph.D. in chemical engineering at the University of Colorado in Boulder. Upon graduation, he accepted a postdoctoral position at Los Alamos National Laboratories, working on space-based neutral particle beam guns and on x-ray lasers. In 1989, he joined Exxon Research and Development Labs in Baton Rouge. Having never lost the wanderlust he developed in Germany, he left Exxon after five years and opened dive operations, first in Honduras and later in Bali, Indonesia. While teaching dive math and physics in Bali, he was recruited to teach math at the National Campus of the College of Micronesia in Kolonia, Pohnpei, FSM. John again returned to the U.S. in the summer of 2008 to participate in the presidential elections that year. He taught calculus-based physics, statics, dynamics, materials, and developmental math at Central Lakes Community College in Brainerd, Minn. Having frozen to death several times during the next three years, he accepted employment at Mohave Community College in Kingman, Ariz. During his first semester there, he set up an A.S. program in engineering as part of METSTEP, and thoroughly enjoyed his first winter there. Introduction to Engineering was taught for the first time ever at Mohave in Spring 2012 by Saber with 10 students.

visit author page

biography

Clark Vangilder Central Arizona College

visit author page

Clark Vangilder is the PI of the Central Arizona Community College METSTEP program. Clark is a former Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plant Operator prior to receiving a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Grand Canyon University in 1995 and a master’s degree in physics from Arizona State University in 2004. Central Arizona College hired Clark in 2008 to take over the physics program, as well as resurrect the pre-engineering program in conjunction with two separate grant opportunities, one including the exploratory STEP grant that has evolved into METSTEP. In addition to the standard introductory design course which articulates to all three Arizona universities, Clark has created course sequences in MATLAB and Python, which also articulate. In the coming year, new curriculum and an associate’s degree will be drafted and submitted for approval. At the present time, Clark is also pursuing a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology in order to promote a new theory of learning, of his design.

visit author page

biography

Anita Grierson Arizona State University

visit author page

Anita E. Grierson has been the Director of the METS Center in the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering at ASU since 2008. Grierson has more 10 years corporate experience in program management, business development, and biomechanical engineering, with products as diverse as air bag systems for helicopters, body armor, and orthopedic implants. She received her
bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1990, her
master's degree in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University in 1994, and a master's in business administration from Arizona State University in 2000.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Leveraging S-STEM Scholarship Programs AbstractWith increasing tuition fees, more and more students are finding themselves unable to meet thefinancial needs of college. Engineering and computer science are difficult majors and studentsmajoring in these fields find that if they have to work while going to school, the task is evenmore difficult. It often takes five years for students to graduate and many students find itdifficult to continue to take loans in order to stay in school. It is not uncommon to find that 80%of the students at a large university need financial help. The National Science Foundation is wellaware of the critical need for more engineers in the United States and the need for the availabilityof more scholarships to help support engineering students. However, just providing money tostudents does not ensure their success.This paper describes how a major university has leveraged NSF S-STEM grants (0807134,0728695, and 1060226) with an NSF STEP grant (0856834) to produce a highly successfulprogram focused on retention, graduation, and graduate degrees. The current system was begunin 2002 with an S-STEM grant (Collaborative Interdisciplinary Research Community – CIRC)for upper division and graduate engineering and computer science students. In 2003, an S-STEM grant for upper division transfer students was begun (CIRC/METS – MotivatedEngineering Transfer Students). Feeding into the CIRC program was an S-STEM program forlower division engineering, computer science, and mathematics students. In 2009, scholarshipswere added to the program for students from five non-metropolitan community colleges throughthe STEP grant already mentioned.The students in the above programs receive $4,000 scholarships per academic year. The studentsin the upper division S-STEM programs must be full-time students in engineering and computerscience. Mathematics students are also accepted from the lower division S-STEM program. Thestudents must be US citizens or permanent residents, have a 3.0 GPA, and have unmet financialneed according to FAFSA. Since there are more qualified students who apply for thescholarships than there are scholarships, additional students can earn a $300 scholarship for atotal of two semesters by completing an Academic Success Class that is required of thescholarship holders.The students in the lower division S-STEM meet six times a year for their own program. All ofthe upper division and graduate students meet together six times a year with a choice of fivemeetings times (three on a Thursday and two on a Friday) in order to accommodate all of theirschedules. The programming will be described in the paper.These programs have attained a 90-95% retention rate. For upper division transfer students notin the program, the graduation rate is about 70% for males and 64% for females. The transferGPA shock was shown to be negligent for new program transfer students, compared with a halfgrade point drop for new upper division transfer students not in the program. And, mostimportantly, during the past three years, 50% of the graduated scholarship students have goneright on to graduate school full-time. Several of the students are now in PhD programs preparingto become professors.

Anderson-Rowland, M. R., & Rodriguez, A. A., & Hall, R. A., & McBride, P. B., & Pangasa, R., & Saber, J. M., & Vangilder, C., & Grierson, A. (2012, June), Leveraging S-STEM Scholarship Programs Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/21656

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2012 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015