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Leveraging the ASEE Annual Conference Robot Competition to Increase ECE Recruiting and Retention

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Digital Systems Education 2

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

26.1093.1 - 26.1093.13

DOI

10.18260/p.24430

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24430

Download Count

230

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Paper Authors

biography

Chad Eric Davis P.E. University of Oklahoma

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Chad E. Davis received the B.S. degree in mechanical engineering, M.S. degree in electrical engineering, and Ph.D. degree in engineering from the University of Oklahoma (OU), Norman, in 1994, 2000, and 2007, respectively. Since 2008, he has been a member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty, University of Oklahoma. Prior to joining the OU-ECE faculty, he worked in industry at Uponor (Tulsa, OK), McElroy Manufacturing (Tulsa, OK), Lucent (Oklahoma City, OK), Celestica (Oklahoma City, OK), and Boeing (Midwest City, OK). His work experience ranges from electromechanical system design to automation of manufacturing and test processes. His research at OU involves GPS ground-based augmentation systems utilizing feedback control. Dr. Davis holds a professional engineering license in the state of Oklahoma. He currently serves as the faculty advisor for Robotics Club, the Loyal Knights of Old Trusty, and Sooner Competitive Robotics at OU and he serves as the recruitment and outreach coordinator for OU-ECE. He received the Provost's Outstanding Academic Advising Award in 2010 and the Brandon H. Griffin Teaching Award in the COE at OU in both the 2012/13 and 2013/14 academic years.

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biography

Rick Pendergraft University of Oklahoma

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Rick A. Pendergraft received the B.S., and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering, and Ph.D. degree in engineering from the University of Oklahoma (OU), Norman, in 2000, 2001, and 2013, respectively. Since 2014, he has been a member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty, University of Oklahoma. Prior to joining the OU-ECE faculty, he worked in industry at Fidelity Information Services (FIS) (Oklahoma City, OK). His work experience includes software developer, software architect, and development manager. His research at OU involves GPS ground-based augmentation systems and electric powered vehicles.

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Abstract

Leveraging the ASEE Annual Conference Robot Competition to Increase ECE Recruiting and RetentionAbstract:In 2012 a corrective action plan was implemented at our university to reverse drasticdeclines in ECE undergraduate enrollment. The ECE enrollment numbers in fall 2008were 246, but by fall 2014 they soared to 440. The research that went into ourplan revealed that a freshman engineering course is a critical place to start. In response,multiple ECE led freshman engineering orientation sections were created that were opento all engineering majors. These courses were found to produce good results in retentionand also in non-ECE students matriculating into ECE. In the fall 2014 semester new ECEled freshman orientation sections were created that would utilize many innovativepractices. These new sections would use the robotics competition at the 2015 ASEEAnnual Conference to set the curriculum and provide motivation for the students to learn.Each section was challenged at the beginning of the semester with creating a robot thatcould compete in the ASEE Robot Competition and during the course of the semesterbackground knowledge needed to complete the project was provided in hands-on focusedlab exercises. Since most of these students had little experience in robotics the activitieswere interesting to them and the thought of creating a functional robot that could competeat a high level served as excellent motivation.Besides the past experience in ECE recruiting and retention gains from robotics-basedfreshman courses, another reason this approach was considered resulted from a failedexperience at the 2014 ASEE Robot Competition. A student group at our university thatfocuses on competing in numerous robotics competitions per year decided to add thisfreshman/sophomore based competition to their schedule in the 2013/14 academic year.They thought it would be a good way to get younger ECE students involved in thestudent organization and serve as a pipeline to the more advanced robotics competitionteams. After much difficulty finding willing participants, the ASEE robot team wasformed. The students on the team enjoyed the process, but were unable to finish veryhigh in the competition. One disadvantage they felt that contributed to their poor finishwas that many other teams had some form of course that went along with the competitionso the unskilled students could obtain background knowledge and have structured time towork on the project instead of learning and creating everything on an extracurricularbasis. With this in mind this robot-based student organization looked to use this course asa first step at the 2015 ASEE robot team as well as an opportunity to recruit and mentormany future organization members. This paper will describe the background that led tothis course, the curriculum that resulted, learning goals, and the mentoring structure withthe ECE student organization. Surveys will be used to assess how the students in thiscourse felt the goals of this course were met. Data will be used to analyze threeimportant metrics that are viewed as necessary for this course to be successful: retention,matriculation, and student group membership.

Davis, C. E., & Pendergraft, R. (2015, June), Leveraging the ASEE Annual Conference Robot Competition to Increase ECE Recruiting and Retention Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24430

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015