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Librarians: The next generation. Mentorship at the University of Toronto

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

The Human Element of Librarianship

Tagged Division

Engineering Libraries

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

26.1096.1 - 26.1096.10

DOI

10.18260/p.24433

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24433

Download Count

77

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Paper Authors

biography

Angela Henshilwood University of Toronto

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Angela has been a Faculty Liaison and Instruction Librarian at the University of Toronto's Engineering & Computer Science Library since February 2014. She has an Honours Bachelor of Arts and a Master of Information Studies, both from the University of Toronto.

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biography

Cristina Sewerin University of Toronto

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Cristina Sewerin is Acting Head of the Engineering & Computer Science Library at University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada.

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biography

Michelle Spence University of Toronto

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Michelle Spence is a Reference & Instruction Librarian at the University of Toronto’s Engineering & Computer Science Library. She holds a HBSc (2004) and a MISt (2007), both from the University of Toronto. She has held positions in academic and public libraries, as well as a corporate setting.

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biography

Tracy Zahradnik University of Toronto

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Tracy Zahradnik is a Liaison and Instruction Librarian at the
Engineering & Computer Science Library at University of Toronto. She holds a BSc (Zoology, University of Guelph), MSc (Zoology, University of Guelph), MI (Library and Information Sciences, University of Toronto) and a PhD (Biology, Simon Fraser University).

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Abstract

Librarians: The next generation. Mentorship at the University of Toronto LibrariesMentoring is to librarianship what chocolate syrup is to ice cream sundaes: a delicious anddefining feature. The profession prides itself on initiating its newest members into the fold and avariety of approaches to mentorship for up and coming librarians are underway at the Universityof Toronto. For example, practicums for library and information science (LIS) students, and anew internship program at the University of Toronto Libraries for top incoming LIS students.These programs are facilitated by the fact that the University of Toronto is home to a topInformation school that has been dedicated to training new librarians since 1928. The authorswill present their experience working with student librarians at the engineering library, which onseveral occasions has led to graduate student workers who return for full-time professionalpositions – a testament to the mutual benefits of the relationship.The authors will also discuss the ongoing mentoring of the newest engineering librarians on theirteam. These efforts include invitations to meetings with engineering faculty to facilitatenetworking, involvement in a variety of decision making processes, and careful training for ahost of new responsibilities. The team’s more experienced librarians impart their expertise andact as coach and counsellor, providing critique and encouragement as necessary. Priorities alsoinclude acculturation and socialization to the library environment. More generally, the Universityof Toronto intrinsically mentors its librarians by requiring professional development activities asa condition for achieving permanent (tenured) status. The mentoring relationship has provenbeneficial for the mentors as well. Knowledge transfer and reflecting on career pathways canprovide perspective and motivation for experienced librarians. Additionally, the authors willpresent on areas for improvement and recommendations for future mentoring initiatives. Thediscussion will include a review of the research related to mentoring new employees, includingfindings that show a direct correlation between active mentoring practices and employeeretention rates.

Henshilwood, A., & Sewerin, C., & Spence, M., & Zahradnik, T. (2015, June), Librarians: The next generation. Mentorship at the University of Toronto Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24433

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015