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Live Energy: An Initiative for Teaching Energy and Sustainability Topics with the Most Up-to-date and Relevant Content.

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

25.901.1 - 25.901.13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--21658

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/21658

Download Count

155

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Paper Authors

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Christine Ehlig-Economides University of Houston (CoE)

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Sukesh K. Aghara Prairie View A&M University

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Sukesh Aghara is a tenured Associate Professor at Prairie View A&M University (PV) in the Department of Chemical Engineering (nuclear), a member of the Texas A&M University System. He is the PI/Director of the $1 million per year, five-year, NSF CREST Center for Energy and Environmental Sustainability. His expertise includes radiation shielding analysis and experimental design, applications of nuclear analytical techniques, and nuclear energy and security.

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Sarma V. Pisupati Pennsylvania State University, University Park Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-2098-3302

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Sarma V. Pisupati is an Associate Professor and Program Officer of the Energy Engineering Program in the Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences at Penn State. He earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering and a Ph.D. in fuel science. He has been studying, and teaching about energy resources, conversion, and consequences on the local and global environment and future energy alternatives.

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Reza Toossi California State University, Long Beach

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Reza Toossi is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at California State University, Long Beach. He received his B.S. degree from the Sharif University of Technology in Iran and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley, all in mechanical engineering. He continued his postdoctoral research studies at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and joined the CSULB faculty in 1981.

Toossi has worked both as a research scientist and consultant on various projects related to aqueous aerosols and droplets in the atmosphere, nuclear safety, sensor design, air pollution dispersion modeling, flame propagation, fluid mechanics, and fiber optics. His current interests include conducting research and teaching courses in heat transfer, combustion, hybrid-electric vehicles, hydrogen storage, environmental engineering, and renewable energy sources.

Toossi is a member of ASME, ASEE, SAE, SPIE, AAPT, and TBP, as well as a recipient of the 1995 CSULB Distinguished Faculty Scholarly and Creative Achievement Award, the 1994/1995 Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award, and the TRW Excellence in Teaching Award. He serves as the Co-chair of CSULB Sustainability Task Force.

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Anthony R. Kovscek Stanford University

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Tony Kovscek is a professor of energy resources engineering at Stanford University where he joined the faculty in 1996. His academic interests center around the efficient use of energy as well as the interplay of fluid and heat flow in porous media in combination with the phase behavior of brine, oil, gas, and carbon dioxide. Kovscek has been honored with the Distinguished Achievement Award for Faculty from the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), the SPE Western North America Region Technical Achievement Award, and he was the inaugural Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) Distinguished Lecturer in Carbon Sequestration. He holds B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Washington and University of California, Berkeley, respectively.

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Mehmet Ayar Texas A&M University

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Emily Binks-Cantrell Texas A&M University

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Emily Binks-Cantrell is a faculty member with the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Culture at Texas A&M University. Her area of research interests include literacy, higher education teaching practices, and survey design and analysis. She is a statistical consultant for Live Energy, a collaborative research project between the College of Education and College of Engineering.

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Don R. Gilman P.E. Texas A&M University

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Don Gilman has been an IT professional and entrepreneur since 1983. His IT interests include team building, software engineering, and cost effective audit compliance. His business start-ups have been IT-related, with three being computer game companies. Gilman holds an ITIL Foundations certification, and is a Licensed Professional Engineer (software). Gilman has been active in various local, state, and national organizations including Rotary, Computer Cleanup Day, Leadership Brazos, B/CS Library Board, multiple IT groups, and the Texas Board of Professional Engineers, and has been nominated to serve on a national committee for the development of a standard professional engineering examination in software engineering.

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Dennie L. Smith Texas A&M University

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Dennie Smith is a professor of education in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Culture at Texas A&M University, College Station. He received his Ed.D. in curriculum and instruction at Auburn University in 1969. Prior to his current position, he worked as Department Head at Texas A&M for eight years. Smith's research is in simulation, animation, and technology utilization in teaching and learning.

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Timothy Allen Robinson Pennsylvania State University

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Bugrahan Yalvac Texas A&M University

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Bugrahan Yalvac is an Assistant Professor of science education in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Culture at Texas A&M University, College Station. He received his Ph.D. in science education at the Pennsylvania State University in 2005. Prior to his current position, he worked as a learning scientist for the VaNTH Engineering Research Center at Northwestern University for three years. Yalvac’s research is in STEM education, 21st century skills, and design and evaluation of learning environments informed by the How People Learn framework.

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Abstract

Live Energy: An Initiative for Teaching Energy and Sustainability Topics with the most Up-to-date and Relevant Content.In this NSF funded collaborative research project, five engineering faculty across the UScampuses are co-authoring an online textbook with the most up-to-date and relevant contentmaterial to teach energy and its sustainability to college students. Existing textbook materials onenergy and its sustainability are very limited in number and they often fail to provide the mostrecent information to the reader. Because of the evolving nature of the technical, political,economic, and societal settings that impact the mass media’s and public’s comprehension ofenergy and its sustainability, the traditional printed textbook materials are not sufficientlyproviding a global, trans-disciplinary, and up-to-date content. Our engineering professors and theNSF have recognized the need to develop textbook material involving dynamic content in naturethat can be updated frequently online by multiple authors to better serve the needs of the collegestudents learning about energy and its sustainability. Led by the TAMU College Station campus,five engineering faculty began working with technology experts and learning scientists inOctober 2010.In the poster presentation, we will describe the nature of our collaboration outlining the coursesoffered in the participating institutions (Penn State, Stanford, CSLA, TAMU Prairie View andTAMU College Station), our purpose of co-authoring the online textbook material, and ourresearch design to evaluate the impact of the developed textbook material on student learningexperiences. Among the measures we attempt capturing are the students’ content understanding,their life-long learning skills, their attitudes towards engineering, and their learning skillspertaining to energy and its sustainability. The content questionnaire instrument includes 20multiple-choice items written by one of our faculty members. The life-long learning scale andthe engineering attitude scale were cited in the literature with valid and reliable measures. Ourresearch team designed the remaining energy and its sustainability learning skills items.We collected control data from four of the five institutions in Spring 2011 semester. Students infour classes were the study participants. The pre and post responses of the students to theresearch instruments revealed that the traditional textbook materials (or the instruction withoutour online textbook material) did not show much improvement on students’ contentunderstanding and their skills and attitudes pertaining to energy and engineering. Findings alsoshow no institutional differences. We used the collected control data to evaluate the effectivenessof the content questionnaire items. Item analysis revealed a need to redesign six items that hadmarginal difficulty powers or that very insufficiently discriminated the upper and lower studentgroups. The revised items are being used in the Fall 2012 semester. We will continue collectingdata and revise the design as needed.Our faculty members have been drafting the chapters since Summer 2011. The table belowshows the working Table of Contents for the online textbook. In our presentation, we will alsoprovide the overall characteristics of the textbook we anticipate to finish drafting by Fall 2012.Table. The working Table of Contents for the TUES Live Energy online textbook. Section 1. Past, Present, and Future of Energy Chapter 1.1 Energy Sustainability Chapter 1.2 Energy Uses and Sources Chapter 1.3 Energy Conversions Section 2. Valuing Energy, the Environment, and Sustainability Chapter 2.1 Economics of Energy Chapter 2.2 Economics of the Environment Chapter 2.3 Sustainability Metrics Section 3. Fossil Fuel and Bioenergy Chapter 3.1 Coal Chapter 3.2 Oil Chapter 3.3 Natural Gas Chapter 3.4 Unconventional Fossil Resources Chapter 3.5 Bioenergy Chapter 3.6 Environmental Consequences of Combustion Section 4. Nuclear Energy Chapter 4.1 Nuclear Energy Technology Chapter 4.2 Nuclear Energy Policy and Global Issues Section 5. Renewable Energy Sources for Heating and Electricity Chapter 5.1 Hydro Energy Chapter 5.2 Geothermal Energy Chapter 5.3 Solar Thermal Energy Chapter 5.4 Solar Photovoltaic Energy Chapter 5.5 Wind Energy Chapter 5.6 Transmission, Distribution, and Storage for Renewable Energy Sources Section 6. Future Energy Choices Chapter 6.1 Natural Gas as a Bridge Chapter 6.2 Hydrogen Appendices Appendix A: Mathematical Notation Appendix B: Abbreviations and Acronyms


Ehlig-Economides, C., & Aghara, S. K., & Pisupati, S. V., & Toossi, R., & Kovscek, A. R., & Ayar, M., & Binks-Cantrell, E., & Gilman, D. R., & Smith, D. L., & Robinson, T. A., & Yalvac, B. (2012, June), Live Energy: An Initiative for Teaching Energy and Sustainability Topics with the Most Up-to-date and Relevant Content. Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. 10.18260/1-2--21658

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