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Low-Power Energy Harvesting with a Thermoelectric Generator through an Air Conditioning Condenser

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Renewable Energy Topics

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

24.877.1 - 24.877.12

DOI

10.18260/1-2--22810

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22810

Download Count

472

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Paper Authors

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Faruk Yildiz Sam Houston State University

biography

Keith L. Coogler Dr. Sam Houston State University

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Dr. Keith L. Coogler is an instructor of industrial technology at Sam Houston State University. He received a BS in Design & Development and holds a MA in Industrial Education and an Ed.D. in Higher Education from Texas A&M University – Commerce. His primary teaching area is Construction Management. Research interests include: automation, electronics, alternative energy, and “green” construction.

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Abstract

Low Power Energy Harvesting with a Thermoelectric Generator through an Air Conditioning CondenserThermoelectric generators (TEG) are the devices that convert heat into usable electricity. TEGsare made from thermoelectric modules which are solid-state integrated circuits that employ threeestablished thermoelectric effects known as the Peltier, Seebeck, and Thomson effects. TEGsrequire heat as an energy source and TEGs can generate power as long as there is a heat sourcesuch as gas or oil flame, stove, camp fire, industrial machinery, and furnace. Two airconditioning condenser units were used for our research to determine where most temperaturedifferences occur during the operation of condenser. For this purpose, several thermometers wereplaced inside the condenser unit to conduct the measurements. Measurements were recorded forday and night time temperatures to compare variations inside the condenser unit based on theoutdoor temperature. A team of students with a renewable energy projects background installed athermoelectric generator inside an air conditioning condenser unit. The study dealt withefficiency, power generation capability/capacity, cost, size, potential consumer applications, andsystem installation complexity to generate power. The balance of the system included thenumber of the components that went into the system. The test results of the potential applicationswith TEGs will be shared with academia.

Yildiz, F., & Coogler, K. L. (2014, June), Low-Power Energy Harvesting with a Thermoelectric Generator through an Air Conditioning Condenser Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. 10.18260/1-2--22810

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