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Machine Vision And Computerized Animation: Powerful Tools In The Design Of A Robot Assisted Catheterization System

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Graphics and Visualization

Tagged Division

Engineering Design Graphics

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

13.859.1 - 13.859.15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4071

Download Count

40

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Paper Authors

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Jennifer McDonald Daniel Webster College

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Jennifer A. McDonald is a senior at Daniel Webster College enrolled in Aeronautical Engineering, pursuing a Bachelors Degree. Currently she is a Manufacturing Engineering Tech at UltraSource Inc. After receiving her BS degree at Daniel Webster, she intends to pursue systems engineering.
Email: mcdonald_jennifer@dwc.edu

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Sonja Crowder Daniel Webster College

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Sonja M. Crowder is a senior at Daniel Webster College enrolled in Aeronautical Engineering, pursuing a Bachelors Degree. Currently she is a Quality Tech (Intern) at UltraSource Inc. After receiving her BS degree at Daniel Webster, she intends to pursue a career in commercial space exploration.
Email: crowder_sonja@dwc.edu

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Christopher McInnis Daniel Webster College

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Christopher M. McInnis is a senior at Daniel Webster College enrolled in Aeronautical Engineering, pursuing a Bachelors Degree. He has worked at SigArms as a design engineer, and currently works at UltraSource Inc. in their design department. He would like to continue his design work, following graduation.
Email: mcinnis_christoper@dwc.edu

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Stavros Yanakis Daniel Webster College

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Stavros C Yanakis is a sophomore at Daniel Webster College enrolled in Mechanical Engineering, pursuing a Bachelors Degree. He has completed the Undergraduate Space Academy at Kennedy Space Center. He would like to continue his passion for engineering, following graduation, with work at government contracted company. Email: Yanakis_Stavros@dwc.edu

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Nicholas Bertozzi Daniel Webster College

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David Kaplan Daniel Webster College

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Michael D'Ambra Harvard Medical School

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Michael N. D'Ambra, M.D. is an Associate Professor of Anaesthesiology at Harvard Medical School and the Senior Cardiac Anesthesiologist at Brigham and Womes Hospital in Boston, MA. He received his BA in Biology/Psychology in 1969 from Brown University and his M.D. from the University of Colorado in 1973. He is currently a reviewer for Critical Care Medicine, Anesthesia and Analgesia, and the New England Journal of Medicine, and is a Senior Examiner for the American Board of Anesthesiologists. Doctor ⁄Ambra has a particular interest in developing machine vision systems for use in surgery.
Email: MDAMBRA@PARTNERS.ORG

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Machine Vision and Computerized Animation: Powerful Tools in Design of a Robot-Assisted Catheterization System

Abstract

The desired skill set for engineers has been steadily expanding. In addition to the common concurrent skills of solid modeling, analysis, CAD/CAM and documentation, machine vision and animation are becoming increasingly valuable tools in the design and implementation of complex systems. Like other components and design software, machine vision system hardware and software have become less costly and easier to use. Animation software has also become easier to use and has proven to be effective in demonstrating and validating design concepts. In this paper, students will describe the processes they went through to learn and utilize machine vision and computerized animation in the design of a robot-assisted catheterization system.

Introduction

The student authors on this paper were approached by two doctors with the challenge of combining robotics, machine vision, and medical imaging to begin developing a system capable of fully autonomous catheterization. Previously, the doctors had demonstrated the ability to perform real-time tracking of central vessels using ultrasound images and machine vision. The next step towards fully autonomous catheterization was to develop the physical infrastructure to complement the code and make the components of the system communicate with each other. Solid modeling was used to prove the concept of the physical system and optimize the configuration. In this phase of the project, hands-free imagery was achieved to be used by an operator completing central vessel catheterization.

The hands-free system provides the operator with the ability to use medical imaging to more easily and accurately find central vessels in clinical applications, and initiates the infrastructure for future, fully automated catheterization which will be required for autonomous surgical projects such as the DARPA Trauma Pod Concept1. Another research group at the University of Washington has been working on a remote, telerobotic operating room for use in military applications, allowing quicker response times for surgery on the battlefield2. Whether autonomous or controlled by telecommunications, the robotic operating room will require catheterization, and autonomous catheterization in trauma situations will be advantageous.

Background

The three main steps during trauma resuscitation are gaining control of hemorrhaging, maintaining a functioning airway, and supporting circulation. Vital to circulatory support is obtaining intravenous access. If a central vein is chosen for access, rapid and reliable infusion of medicines and fluids can be administered. In addition, important intravascular pressure measurements can be obtained with closed loop monitoring of a central vein. Unlike peripheral veins, central veins are anatomically consistent; in severe trauma with loss of an extremity, peripheral veins may not be present. Central veins can be readily identified using ultrasound, a modality used in current medical practice. To achieve autonomous trauma resuscitation in

McDonald, J., & Crowder, S., & McInnis, C., & Yanakis, S., & Bertozzi, N., & Kaplan, D., & D'Ambra, M. (2008, June), Machine Vision And Computerized Animation: Powerful Tools In The Design Of A Robot Assisted Catheterization System Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4071

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