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Mems And Microsystems Courses With National And International Dissemination

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Trends in Engineering Education Poster Session

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

11.923.1 - 11.923.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1318

Download Count

140

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Paper Authors

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Leo McAfee University of Michigan

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Leo C. McAfee received the BS in electrical engineering from Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX, in 1966, and the MSE and PhD degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, in 1967 and 1970, respectively. He joined the University of Michigan in 1971 and is currently an associate professor. He has had summer and leave positions at General Motors Research Laboratories, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, AT&T Bell Laboratories, and Telecom Analysis Systems. He has held leadership positions for curriculum and degree program development, as well as chief undergraduate and graduate program advisor. He is a member of IEEE and ASEE.

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Khalil Najafi University of Michigan

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Yogesh Gianchandani University of Michigan

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Kensall D. Wise University of Michigan

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Kensall D. Wise received the BSEE degree from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 1963 and the MSEE and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, in 1964 and 1969, respectively. From 1963 to 1965, and from 1972 to 1974, he was a member of technical staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories. In 1974, he joined the University of Michigan, where he is now the William Gould Dow Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engin-eering and Computer Science, the J. Reid and Polly Anderson Professor of Manufacturing Technology, and Professor of Biomedical Engineering. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and the AIMBE and a member of the United States National Academy of Engineering.

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Michel M. Maharbiz University of Michigan

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Michel M. Maharbiz is an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering Departments at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; he is a member of the Wireless Integrated Microsystems NSF ERC and the National Nanotechnology Initiative Network. His expertise lies at the interface of micro/nanotechnologies, tissue and cell culture, with specific emphasis on systems for controlling the microenvironment of developing cells.

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Dean Aslam Michigan State University

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Dean M. Aslam received the MS and PhD degrees from Aachen Technical University (RWTH), Germany, in physics (1979) and electrical engineering (1983), respectively. From 1983 to 1984, he was a research associate at Aachen. During 1984 to 1988, he held faculty positions at PAF College of Aeronautical Engineering (Karachi) and Wayne State University (Detroit) before joining Michigan State University in 1988 as associate professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is currently an associate director of the Engineering Research Center for Wireless Integrated MicroSystems. His research focuses on the use of carbon-based micro and nanotechnologies in sensors, packaging, RFMEMS, and BioMEMS. He was a recipient of a German DAAD Fellowship during 1975 to 1983. Dr. Aslam is a senior member of IEEE.

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Paul Bergstrom Michigan Technological University

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Paul L. Bergstrom received the BSEE degree, summa cum laude, from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, in 1989, and the MSEE and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, in 1993 and 1996, respectively. From 1996 through 2000, he was a member of technical staff at Motorola Inc., Semiconductor Products Sector in Mesa, AZ. In 2000, he joined the faculty at Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, where he conducts research on microsystem materials and devices and nanoscaled device technologies for single electron transistors. He serves as the faculty director of the Microfabrication Facility at Michigan Tech. He is a member of the IEEE and the ASEE.

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Craig Friedrich Michigan Technological University

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Craig R. Friedrich received the BSME and MSME degrees from Louisiana Tech University in 1978 and 1981, respectively. He received the PhD in mechanical engineering from Oklahoma State University in 1987. His industrial experience includes senior product engineer with the Pangborn Corporation, nuclear engineer with the U.S. Navy, and vice president of Young & Friedrich Consulting Engineers. In 1987, he joined the faculty of Louisiana Tech University and later became associate director and group leader of Micromechanical Processes at the Institute for Micromanufacturing. He joined the faculty of Michigan Technological University in 1997. He has served on the board of directors of the Laser Institute of America.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

MEMS and Microsystem Courses with National and International Dissemination*

Abstract

The Wireless Integrated MicroSystems (WIMS) Engineering Research Center (ERC) has developed a broad comprehensive MEMS and microsystem curriculum suitable for upper-level undergraduate students, graduate students, and industry professionals. Five core courses were in the initial curriculum design. The design had flexibility that invited development of other core courses, as well as related technical electives and breadth electives. The core courses provide instruction in MEMS, Microsystems, major design and laboratory measurements, and societal impact. The course enrollments have been strong. A master of engineering in integrated microsystems degree program was developed so that industry professionals would have a focused set of coursework, while providing flexibility that would permit custom tailoring of the total course package to serve specific needs. Distance education dissemination of the courses as whole courses, or as discrete portions of course materials, was intended to be available; that goal has been realized. The core courses originate at the University of Michigan (UM), and have been distributed to Michigan State University (MSU), Michigan Technological University (MTU), Howard University (HU), University of Puerto Rico – Mayaguez (UPRM), and Western Michigan University (WMU). Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) has used materials from the UM core courses in its offerings. Other institutions that have used the course web-streaming video and course materials are University of Lille, Darmstadt University, and Middle East Technical University.

Introduction and Overview

The Engineering Research Center for Wireless Integrated MicroSystems (WIMS ERC) has developed five core courses (Figure 1) that provide a broad comprehensive curriculum in MEMS and microsystems for upper-level undergraduate students, graduate students, and industry professionals. The five core courses originate at the University of Michigan (UM): Introduction to MEMS (EECS 414), Integrated Microsystems Laboratory (EECS 425), Advanced MEMS Devices and Technologies (EECS 514), Advanced Integrated Microsystems (EECS 515), and Societal Impact of Microsystems (EECS 830). The first of these courses has now been disseminated worldwide, while the second is exploring ways of porting a laboratory course to different universities. The Societal Impact course explores the global societal challenges that will be faced by students during their careers and how microsystems will be used to address them. Each course is a four credit-hour course, except EECS 830 is a two credit-hour course.

During a two-day education retreat, the MEMS/Microsystem curriculum was designed to (1) provide students with a comprehensive background in MEMS/microsystems theory, fabrication, practice, applications, and technology, (2) accommodate students from broad disciplines across science and engineering by developing a first course that had minimal prerequisites in science (physics and chemistry), math, and engineering, (3) use the first course as the only prerequisite for the remaining core courses, (4) develop course materials with the expectation that distance education with web-based dissemination would be a primary format, (5) serve undergraduate and

McAfee, L., & Najafi, K., & Gianchandani, Y., & Wise, K. D., & Maharbiz, M. M., & Aslam, D., & Bergstrom, P., & Friedrich, C. (2006, June), Mems And Microsystems Courses With National And International Dissemination Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/1318

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