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Mentoring Millenial Women in Engineering

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Mentoring Millennial Women in Engineering

Tagged Division

Women in Engineering

Page Count

2

Page Numbers

25.930.1 - 25.930.2

DOI

10.18260/1-2--21687

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/21687

Download Count

389

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Paper Authors

biography

David Porush MentorNet

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David Porush is CEO of MentorNet. He earned his B.Sc. from MIT and his Ph.D. from SUNY, Buffalo. He was professor at RPI from 1981-1998 and Director of the AI Research Lab, as well as Founder and Director of the Electronic Media Arts & Communication B.S. degree program. From 2003-2007, he was Executive Director of SUNY Learning Environments, administering grants for new educational media for the 64 campus SUNY system and created the first B.S. in E.E. degree online. Porush is an author of numerous books, articles, and essays, including The Soft Machine (1985).

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Abstract

Mentoring Millenial Women in Engineering What research tells mentors about navigating the gender and generation gap David Porush, Ph.D. CEO, MentorNetMentorNet, a nonprofit education organization, has created 30,000 pairs of mentors andprotégés and supported their one-on-one relationship with special focus on reachingwomen and minorities in engineering. 58% of all our protégés are female universitystudents in 70 engineering and science disciplines. Supported by the NSF and our 100+campus partners, we survey participants in our e-mentoring program about theirexperience and track trends about shifting expectations and experiences of mentors andprotégés.In this paper, MentorNet will present findings on new trends among female millenials(born after 1980). These changes have been driven in large part by new media, newcommunications styles, expectations about work-life balance, and mobility. We will alsosuggest strategies for mentors – who are still overwhelmingly male and over 40 years old– to accommodate those shifts, with the goals of enhancing the dialogue between mentorsin the workplace, diversifying the engineering professions, and easing the pathway ofwomen into engineering careers.Contact: David Porushdavid@mentornet.net408.296.4405 x0

Porush, D. (2012, June), Mentoring Millenial Women in Engineering Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. 10.18260/1-2--21687

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