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Meteoritics And Materials In An Me Lab Course

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Trends in Engineering Education Poster Session

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

12.1061.1 - 12.1061.17

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2013

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

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Brandon Hathaway Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Brandon Hathaway is a senior Mechanical Engineering student at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. After graduation in May 2007, Brandon continue his studies in graduate school.

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Ashley Bernal Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Ashley Bernal is a graduate of the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. Ms. Bernal is a Project Engineer with Boeing Aerospace in St. Louis.

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Cory Edds Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Cory Edds is a senior Mechanical Engineering student at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Cory will be employed as a Project Engineer by Marathon-Ashland Petroleum upon graduation.

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Neil Miller Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Neil Miller is a senior Mechanical Engineering student at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Neil will graduate with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in May 2007.

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Richard Layton Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Richard A. Layton is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. His professional interests include system dynamics, curriculum and laboratory development, and project- and team-based learning. His interest in students' teaming experiences and the technical merit of team deliverables is founded on his years of experince in consulting engineering and project management.

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David Fisher Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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David S. Fisher has been an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology since 2005. Dr. Fisher received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 2005. Dr. Fisher is a graduate of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering.

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Howard McLean Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Howard McLean is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Dr. McLean's interests lie in the fields of biological, environmental and geological chemistry as well as meteorite research.

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Patrick Ferro Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Patrick Ferro is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Dr. Ferro received his Ph.D. in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines. His professional interests are in casting, joining, heat treating and alternative energy.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

33

Meteoritics and Materials in an ME Lab Course

B. Hathaway, C. Edds, A. Bernal, N. Miller, H. McLean, R.A. Layton, D.S. Fisher, P.D. Ferro

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Abstract:

One of the objectives of the ME Senior Lab Course at Rose-Hulman (ME421) is to have students experience a 'test and refine' cycle. During the first half of the ten-week quarter, ME421 students select an experimental project, perform an experimental procedure to obtain data, and present results to the team of instructors. The latter half of the course is spent performing refined experimental work based on instructor feedback.

One of the selected projects during the most recent offering of the course was based on the study of meteorites. A student team embarked on a project of experimentally heat treating meteorite samples, and correlating the grain growth results to similarly heat treated steel specimens. The theory that the students sought to demonstrate was based on a determination of the activation energy for grain growth in meteorites.

Using meteorites in a Mechanical Engineering curriculum is shown to be a cross-disciplinary experience. During the course of the quarter, students interacted with faculty from the Physics, Chemistry and Materials disciplines, as well as within their home Mechanical Engineering Department. Challenges involved determining which heat treatment time and temperature regime give measurable grain growth, and determining suitable polishing and etching procedures for the samples. Recommendations for future course offerings are given.

1. Introduction – About ME 421, Mechanical Engineering Laboratory

Mechanical Engineering Laboratory is a required two-credit course for senior-level students in the ME Department at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (RHIT). One of the primary objectives of the course is to have students experience a 'test and refine' cycle. Student teams select an experimental project, perform a literature search, conduct research and report results within the first half of the quarter. After receiving instructor feedback at the formal project review (mid-quarter, at five weeks), the student teams refine their experimental efforts and report the finalized results in a professional-quality written report. The course deliverables are an oral presentation at mid-quarter and a comprehensive written report at the end of the quarter.

Proceedings of the Spring 2007 American Society for Engineering Education Illinois-Indiana Section Conference. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Engineering Education

Hathaway, B., & Bernal, A., & Edds, C., & Miller, N., & Layton, R., & Fisher, D., & McLean, H., & Ferro, P. (2007, June), Meteoritics And Materials In An Me Lab Course Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2013

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