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Microelectronic Engineering And Nanotechnology Education For Undergraduates And Pre College Students Through Curriculum Reform And Outreach Activities

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Micro-/Nano-Technology Education

Tagged Division

Materials

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

13.893.1 - 13.893.8

DOI

10.18260/1-2--3450

Permanent URL

https://jee.org/3450

Download Count

64

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Paper Authors

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Santosh Kurinec Rochester Institute of Technology

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Santosh K. Kurinec is Professor and the Department Head of Microelectronic Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology. She has led the effort on curriculum reform and is the Principle Investigator of this work. She teaches courses on microelectronic processing and electronic materials. She has extensive experience on materials integration in semiconductor devices.

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Michael Jackson Rochester Institute of Technology

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Mike Jackson is an Associate Professor of Microelectronic Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology. His research experience includes materials, thin films and metrology. He directs outreach activities in the Department of Microelectronic Engineering at RIT.

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Thomas Schulte Rochester Institute of Technology

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Tom Schulte is a science teacher at the West Irondequoit High School, Rochester, NY. He is the K-12 Outreach Coordinator for the Department of Microelectronic Engineering at Rochester Institute Technology. He brings a unique combination of engineering education, industrial experience and high school teaching.

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Nathaniel Kane Rochester Institute of Technology

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Nate is an undergraduate student of BS program in Microelectronic Engineering. Nate has served this work in being the first service learning intern in a local high school.

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Elaine Lewis Rochester Institute of Technology

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Elaine Lewis is the Outreach Specialist in the Department of Microelectronic Engineering at RIT. Elaine served as photolithography engineer at General Electric and Eastman Kodak Company prior to joining RIT. She is dedicated to communicating science and engineering to K-12 teachers and students.

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Surendra Gupta Rochester Institute of Technology

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"Vinnie" Gupta is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering, and the recipient of the 2000 Eisenhart Award for Excellence in Teaching. At RIT, he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Applied Mechanics, Computational Techniques, and Materials Science.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Microelectronic Engineering and Nanotechnology Education for Undergraduates and Pre-College Students through Curriculum Reform and Outreach Activities

Abstract

The extension of microelectronics to new frontiers that include MEMS, nanotechnology, flexible electronics, biotechnology, energy and solid state lighting is inevitable. Development of a necessary multi faceted work force is critical to our nation’s innovation edge in these fields. The Department of Microelectronic Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology received an NSF implementation grant in 2005 to institute a major department level reform (DLR) to address this critical need. The key elements of this effort consist of curriculum reform in the main program, creation of a novel minor program and diverse activities to reach out to K-12 and pre- college community. The curriculum reform consisting of creation of free electives through course consolidations and new course development that included a new nanocharacterization laboratory based course has been instituted. A K-12 teachers’ forum on microelectronics and nanotechnology has been developed and delivered. A program package that includes instructional materials, available for wider dissemination, has been developed. A unique ‘service learning’ co-op experience has been piloted where an engineering student spent two academic quarters in a high school under the guidance of the physics teacher to develop physics laboratories and mentor students in math and science. Feedback from students outlined the benefit of having another knowledgeable individual in the classroom to gain insight about careers in engineering which hopefully will translate into students choosing engineering as a career. These initiatives have significantly enhanced the educational programs at RIT.

Introduction

The semiconductor industry has entered nanotechnology. The smallest feature size printed on an integrated circuit is known as the technology node. The industry has already announced its readiness for the 45nm technology node in production with 32nm node on the horizon. The curricula developed by Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) have kept pace with the rapid advancements sharing 25 of the 40 years of the Moore’s Law and have contributed significantly in generating the workforce and research for this growing high tech industry. One of the great challenges for the future microelectronics and semiconductor technology will be the need to draw on scientific principles and engineering developments from such an extraordinary wide range of disciplines not adequately provided by traditional engineering or science programs. Education must not only keep pace with this trend but also lead and foster this growth. The opportunities in nanoelectronics are considerable. It is predicted that CMOS will be supplemented by novel nano-enabled solutions. Prudent semiconductor manufacturers must plan for nanotech’s impact on their businesses today and prudent educators must plan for educating a high tech engineering workforce.

The Bachelor of Science program in Microelectronic Engineering at RIT started in 1982 with basic PMOS process on 2” wafers. Today, the program supports a complete 4 and 6 inch CMOS line equipped with diffusion, ion implantation, plasma PVD and CVD processes, electro-

Kurinec, S., & Jackson, M., & Schulte, T., & Kane, N., & Lewis, E., & Gupta, S. (2008, June), Microelectronic Engineering And Nanotechnology Education For Undergraduates And Pre College Students Through Curriculum Reform And Outreach Activities Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 10.18260/1-2--3450

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