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Movement From A Taxonomy Driven Strategy Of Instruction To A Challenge Driven Strategy In Teaching Introductory Biomechanics

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

6.729.1 - 6.729.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9571

Download Count

86

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Paper Authors

author page

Sean P. Brophy

author page

Robert Roselli

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1309

Movement from a Taxonomy-Driven Strategy of Instruction to a Challenge-Driven Strategy in Teaching Introductory Biomechanics

Robert J. Roselli, Sean P. Brophy Department of Biomedical Engineering / The Learning Technology Center Vanderbilt University, Nashville TN 37235

Abstract

Many courses adopt a traditional approach to instruction, characterized by lectures that follow a linear progression through a textbook that is organized about the general taxonomy of the subject matter. New theories of learning suggest that this taxonomy-driven instruction offers fewer opportunities for students to develop their problem solving abilities than a challenge-driven approach. We have explored a challenge-driven approach in an introductory biomechanics course (BME 101) required by sophomores in Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University. The course objective is to provide the fundamental principles and biological applications of statics, dynamics, and strength of materials. Until recently, student problem solving was performed exclusively outside the classroom. Current research in the Learning Sciences, as summarized in the book "How People Learn" (HPL) edited by Bransford, et. al, 1999, shows that the most effective learning environments are those that are knowledge-centered, learner- centered, assessment-centered and community-centered. The STAR Legacy Cycle is a learning tool developed at Peabody College that promotes use of the HPL framework to help students solve challenges. We have developed a series of challenges for BME 101 that meet the current course objectives, but with the advantage of placing this instruction within the HPL framework. To ensure adequate taxonomic coverage, we compiled a detailed list of taxonomy-related course objectives and then selected a sufficient number of challenges to meet all of the objectives. Several objectives are re-emphasized by inclusion in multiple challenges. The motivation for using challenge-driven instruction is that instead of giving students problems that are strictly based on the latest taxonomy-driven lecture, we provide real life challenges that put students in the position where they need to determine which parts of the taxonomy are relevant to the problem at hand. We believe that the challenge-driven approach will better prepare students for the workplace and for life-long learning.

Introduction

Introductory Biomechanics (BME 101) is a required course in the biomedical engineering curriculum at Vanderbilt University. Students normally take this course during their sophomore year. Students are expected to have adequate preparation in mechanics from their general physics course and vector analysis and calculus from their freshman math courses. The course objective is to provide the fundamental principles and biological applications of statics, dynamics, and strength of materials. The course has been presented in a very traditional manner since 1988. This approach is characterized by the presentation of lectures and instructor-

Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Brophy, S. P., & Roselli, R. (2001, June), Movement From A Taxonomy Driven Strategy Of Instruction To A Challenge Driven Strategy In Teaching Introductory Biomechanics Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9571

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